Does Oracle’s Acquisition Mean More, More, More for NetSuite?

Something New or More of the Same? Yes

On December 7, 2016 Oracle completed its acquisition of NetSuite. While Oracle acquisitions are nothing new – the company has executed dozens and dozens of them over the years – this one is indeed a unique mix of new and “more of the same.” NetSuite is not the first Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) player to be acquired by Oracle, but there are some “firsts:”

  • The first ERP acquired that was born in the cloud, bringing along that all-important cloud revenue (not to mention SaaS DNA)
  • The first time Oracle has openly and loudly declared the “products will go on forever”
  • The first time the acquired company will be run as a separate global business unit, preserving the brand identity and keeping the leadership largely in tact

Oracle and NetSuite have always had close ties. Larry Ellison invested early in the company and owned close to 40% of the stock prior to the acquisition. Zach Nelson, former CEO of NetSuite, has a very close relationship with Mr. Ellison. And the foundation on which NetSuite’s products are built takes advantage of the “Oracle stack.” That said, they were still rivals. In fact, prior to closing, both companies claimed they were the #1 Cloud ERP company. By combining the two, Oracle is now declaring victory in that battle.

But there are also a couple of “softer” firsts. Perhaps because of the Ellison-Nelson relationship, or perhaps because of NetSuite’s proven success in the market (or both), never before have we seen such respect from Oracle for the accomplishments of the target company or such a welcoming embrace. Mark Hurd, in addressing a group of influencers (including press, industry and financial analysts) lauded NetSuite for “serving a community we have not served well.” That statement alone is one for the record books: Oracle (the company which previously claimed to be the #1 Cloud ERP company) admitting it had not served a market well.

All combined, this bodes well for the NetSuite community.

What “More” Did NetSuite Gain?

When the announcement of Oracle’s intent to acquire NetSuite first hit the wire in July, it was quite clear what Oracle was looking for: more share of the cloud market. “Cloud” is where it’s at today. Mint Jutras has been following perceptions and preferences for SaaS versus on-premise software for years now. Between 2011 and 2013, the demand for traditional on-premise deployments went over a cliff. Since then, preference for SaaS (versus hosting) has continued to climb.

Figure 1 shows the progression of preference over the past several years. The question posed to survey respondents was this: If you were to select a solution today, which deployment options would you consider? Respondents are allowed to select all that apply.

Figure 1: Which Deployment Options Would You Consider?

Source: Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Studies

*Option added in 2015

Combine these preferences with Mr. Ellison’s publicly stated goal of being the first company to reach $10 billion in cloud revenue and you have a pretty good idea of what Oracle was looking to achieve.

The benefit to NetSuite was perhaps not quite as clear. The company was already successful on its own. While it never seemed to record a profit under GAAP reporting, it did show positive cash flow and was profitable by non-GAAP measures. This was largely due to the way GAAP treats stock-based compensation and the fact that just about every employee owned a little piece of NetSuite. So NetSuite was able to invest in the development of its products and was already making steps to expand globally.

But that’s the key to unlocking the motivation… from the NetSuite point of view they couldn’t do either fast enough. As a public company, the leadership was often forced to focus on metrics other than those most conducive to growth. As a business unit of Oracle, the team can focus on what matters most to them, not Wall Street. And it is clear, what matters most is bringing more products to more markets faster.

Being part of the Oracle family means NetSuite gains access to Oracle resources in the form of:

  • Supporting products (think platform and infrastructure). This includes Oracle’s Platform as a Service (PaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Data as a Service (DaaS).
  • More applications to sell (think complementary extensions like supply chain management, human capital management, enterprise performance management and configure-price-quote). NetSuite already had some of these and partnered for others, but this significantly adds product to the bags the sales representatives carry.
  • More people to develop NetSuite products. Oracle has pledged increased funding. It is not clear whether these will be new hires or people who already work for Oracle today on other products. It is likely to be some combination of both.
  • Global presence (think people and business infrastructure around the world) – instantly. NetSuite had started to expand, but only offered support in English and Japanese. Oracle not only has the additional language skills in support, but many more support locations. It also has far more data centers around the world to address the issues (both real and perceived) of where data must be stored when operating in the cloud. This of course, also puts additional feet on the street globally, not only to support, but also to sell.

Conclusion

We go back to the initial question posed: Does the Oracle acquisition of NetSuite represent something new or is it more of the same? The answer is yes. While Oracle is an old hand at acquisitions (so more of the same), this one does have some “firsts,” so there is indeed something new. Oracle has declared the NetSuite products will “live forever,” so this is an instance of “more of the same.” Yet while NetSuite has poured as many resources as it could afford into developing the products, Oracle has deeper pockets and can also bring its own resources to bear in terms of products, people and global reach. So NetSuite will enjoy “more of the same” …but “more” is a relative term. In this case, we believe “more” means “lots more.”

While there may have been some initial trepidation, particularly from NetSuite customers who specifically chose not to purchase a solution from Oracle, it would appear that Oracle is intent on allaying those fears. By operating the acquired company as a global business unit, it preserves the perceived value of NetSuite as a pioneering SaaS vendor. By committing to the continued development of the products while adding depth and weight to its offerings, it would appear product development will be accelerated. And NetSuite gains entrance to global markets instantly. From the outside looking in, Mint Jutras is actually surprised (and pleased) to say that it seems like a win-win.

PS: For those of you not familiar with NetSuite, here is a quick primer:

NetSuite is a leading provider of cloud-based business management software, delivered exclusively as software as a service (SaaS).

Some quick facts about NetSuite at the time of the acquisition:

  • Founded in 1998
  • Publicly traded on NYSE: “N”
  • 5,350 employees
  • $741.1 million in annual revenues for FY 2015, ending 12/31/2015
  • Grown by 30%+ in each of the last 16 consecutive quarters, as of June 30, 2016
  • Used by 30,000+ organizations (includes subsidiaries and affiliates) in more than 100 countries
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One Response to Does Oracle’s Acquisition Mean More, More, More for NetSuite?

  1. Pingback: NetSuite to Leverage Oracle’s Global Resources and Reach | Mint Jutras | Making Enterprise Business Systems Pay Dividends

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