Impressions from SAP Americas Partner Summit: Partners Make it Real

Tis the season for partner summits. SAP Americas Partner Summit was the 3rd of these I attended in a week and a half. This was the first of this type of event for SAP since it recently merged North America and Latin America into a single unit under the direction of Rodolpho Cardenuto, President SAP Americas. This merging of the Americas bucks the trend in the industry. As Latin American economies, most particularly Brazil, continue to emerge, it is more likely for Latin America to be spun off from a previously combined unit.

And the combination of the two Americas has a further bit of a unique twist. Typically North America will be the dominant player, and therefore you might expect it to bring its southern neighbors into the fold. Yet at the Summit, it really felt more like Latin America was taking North America under its wing. Presumably this is largely based on the recent successful growth of Latin America under Mr. Cardenuto’s direction.

Over the course of two days we heard lots from SAP executives on the main stage, in smaller groups and one-on-one meetings. Some of what we heard simply reinforced the four pillars we have been hearing about quite consistently at various events over the past year or more, namely how SAP intends to:

  • Leverage the core business applications
  • Deliver in mobile
  • Lead in the cloud
  • Capitalize on big data (read: HANA, HANA, HANA)

But how do these key elements of SAP’s strategy pertain to the partners and the customers they serve?

Leveraging the core business applications

The key message here: industries are important and partners are critical to building out solutions. There will be common processes across all companies. These common processes are easily handled by basic functionality that has become quite commoditized today, making it hard for any software company to differentiate itself solely on the basics. It is equally hard for any customer running “just the basics” to gain a competitive edge.

SAP’s approach to delivering that source of differentiation is to co-innovate with partners and customers. First of all, SAP constructs specific “value maps” for each of 25 different industries, identifying market trends and specific business capabilities required to compete in these markets. It then creates very unique blocks of solutions for each industry.  The goal is to not just deliver technology, but to create more value for its customers, and therefore SAP is taking a design thinking approach. This has been music to my ears, which are tuned more to business issues than pure technology. I spend much of my time and efforts translating techno-speak to business-speak.

Design thinking is becoming more and more popular these days, but in case you are not familiar with the concept, it is a repeatable process for solving problems and discovering new opportunities. It consists of 4 key elements:

  1. 1.    Define the problem
  2. Create and consider many different options
  3. Refine selected directions
    Repeat steps 2 and 3 until you reach…
  4. Pick the winner; execute

As the pace of change accelerates, as technology allows us to solve problems previously deemed unsolvable, SAP understands it can’t possibly deliver all this value itself, and therefore turns to partners. As Chakib Bouhdary, EVP Industry Solutions and Customer Value stated on stage, “We all have to change our tolerance to IP sharing.” This is an important concept and one critical to encouraging partners to develop complementary solutions, along with a go to market plan that includes revenue sharing.

At first glance this “sharing” of IP and revenue might seem to pertain only to the traditional Value Added Reseller (VAR) or the larger service providers/system integrators. But during the Summit SAP also introduced the SAP PartnerEdge program for Application Development, “a simple and comprehensive program designed to empower partners to build, market and sell software applications on top of market-leading technology platforms from SAP.

How is this new and different? Essentially it lowers the cost of entry for small partners, while also simplifying the process of signing up. Partners can choose from a set of “innovation packs” based on the latest platform technologies from SAP, including the SAP HANA platform, SAP HANA Cloud Platform, SAP Mobile Platform, SAP databases and the SAP NetWeaver platform. The innovation packs contain technology-specific license rights, resources and services to help partners rapidly get enabled to develop applications on SAP platforms. The packs are also designed to support custom development for co-innovation with customers, which often is the first step to developing a more commercial, standard application. All for an entry fee of around 2500 euros.

These small partners pay a low annual fee (500 to 1500 euros per year) for each of these innovation packs. In turn they can also offer their wares through the SAP online app store and potentially reach a much broader market and therefore better monetize their efforts. This encourages a larger volume of smaller partners in a very real “win-win” scenario.

Deliver in Mobile

Notice the SAP Mobile Platform is included above as one of the innovation packs. The consumerization of IT has changed expectations of connectivity and accessibility of data. But nobody (in their right mind) really wants to lift and shift the traditional ERP user interface to a mobile device. Mobile executives today want answers to specific questions, hence the increase in demand for more purpose-built mobile apps. Lots of questions potentially generate the need for lots of mobile apps. And the SAP online app store is the perfect place for partners to showcase those they build on SAP’s mobile platform.

Lead in the Cloud

It seems everyone today wants to claim “leadership” in the cloud and SAP is no exception. With all the “mine is bigger than yours” rhetoric in the market today, determining who is on top is difficult and probably a bit subjective. However, after developing its own “born in the cloud” (SaaS only) business management suite (Business ByDesign), two major “cloud only” acquisitions (SuccessFactors and Ariba), 30 million users in the public cloud and the world’s largest business network supporting $460 billion in transactions, SAP has to be right up there on the leader board.

While there is still a lot of confusion over cloud and SaaS, the interest in both has taken a quantum leap over the past couple of years. I’ve written a lot about the benefits of moving to the cloud, but while others predict that very soon the vast majority of applications will be running in the cloud, my research indicates only 33% will be SaaS in 5 to 10 years. I attribute this to the fact that there are so many solutions running on-premise today and many companies are reluctant to rip and replace only to convert to a SaaS deployment model. So does that limit the number of companies that can effectively leverage the benefit of the cloud to those willing to abandon their current software licenses? SAP says, “No.”

Many of the companies running on-premise solutions would love to relinquish the responsibility of managing and maintaining those solutions and reap the benefits of the cloud. SAP’s answer to this is to offer Managed Cloud as a Service (MCaaS). This isn’t a brand new concept. Back in May, SAP announced its SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud. As I wrote back in May…

On May 7, 2013 SAP announced SAP HANA Enterprise Cloud. As the name implies, it is a cloud-based service that allows an organization to move existing (or new) implementations of the SAP Business Suite and SAP NetWeaver Business Warehouse, powered by HANA, off their own servers and into SAP’s massive data centers. Why would an enterprise want to do this? The short answer: Speed, power and the benefits of cloud computing without the disruption of replacing existing on-premise solutions. Speed and power come from HANA, adding visibility and agility to the business by enabling decisions to be made in real-time with volumes of data that were inconceivable just a short time ago. Cloud computing lowers cost and adds elasticity, allowing capacity to stretch as your business and your need for data grows.

This is not SaaS and is not a public cloud. It is really a private cloud for the customer managed by SAP. This was a purposeful decision on SAP’s part since the objective is to make the solution truly “elastic.” While this term may be common in technology circles, it is less so in the business community. Essentially, it means the customer is never constrained by hardware limitations. Data center configurations expand (transparently to the customer) as more computing power is required. And if there are any lingering concerns about applications running in a public cloud, those go away with this model.

So what does this mean for partners and how is MCaaS different? It means they can bring the benefits of the cloud to those not quite ready for a SaaS solution. Partners can purchase product licenses and offer them, along with other services on a subscription basis. While this is the same concept introduced with the HANA Enterprise Cloud, HANA is not a requirement, nor is the Business Suite. SAP may be hosting the software, but partners may also sign up to do the same. SAP Business One and Business All-in-One are already offered in this kind of hosting model by several of the larger partners.

Capitalize on Big Data (HANA, HANA, HANA)

This was the first SAP event I have attended in a long while where HANA was not the primary focus. Yet its presence was certainly implied, if not directly referenced. Steve Lucas, President, SAP Platform Solutions talked a lot about “the real time connected enterprise:”

  • Real time business applications
  • With real time integrated analytics
  • Delivered on any device in real time (securely anywhere in the world)

Of course you need HANA for this. But I think the real message for the partners here is that SAP needs them to deliver applications that leverage HANA. This makes Dr. Bhoudary’s comment about SAP’s tolerance to IP sharing even more relevant beyond the concept of building out industry solutions. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again (and again and again if necessary)…Without this way of thinking, without the development of applications leveraging its technology, HANA is simply an elegant technical solution in search of a problem. And as Steve Lucas said, “No one wakes up in the morning and says, ‘I really want to install HANA.’ They wake up with problems to solve…. Partners make it real.”

 

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