Acumatica

What Acumatica Customers Want – And Get

Openness, Collaboration, Innovation, Acceleration

Talk to any Acumatica customer and very quickly you hear the word “open.” That’s most often cited as a primary reason the company chose Acumatica’s Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) over other solutions. Why? Because these customers value fit and functionality and completeness of a solution, but they also need flexibility, and often “best of breed” and/or customized functionality to help them differentiate themselves from their competition. But customizing the solution can’t build barriers to growth and change. And for these small to midsize enterprises (SMEs), a flexible, differentiated solution can’t add unwanted complexity and it can’t break the bank.

While many ERP providers today try to be “one stop shops,” the downside of this is added complexity and cost. Acumatica instead chooses to provide an open platform and take a collaborative approach to accelerate innovation, collaborating with customers to plot a product roadmap and with partners to fill gaps and provide specialized functionality. While Acumatica customers don’t necessarily expect ERP to satisfy all their needs, they also don’t want to wind up with a hodge podge of disparate, disconnected solutions. In fact, that is what many are replacing. They turn to Acumatica to facilitate easy integration and connectivity.

This “open” approach provides the added benefit of agility. Face it: We live in disruptive times and disruption can have a cascading impact on business application requirements, making the ability to easily innovate, evolve and change – equally, if not more important than current functionality.

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What Acumatica 6 Means to Digital Transformation

Productivity, Analytics, Technology

The Internet levels the playing field in our global economy, allowing companies of any size to establish a presence and compete on a global scale. But in order to fully participate in this global, digital economy, most companies must undergo a digital transformation. Digital technologies of today, those that serve to connect operations, people and processes through the power of the Internet, have the potential of fundamentally changing the way we do business. Eighty-four percent (84%) of companies participating in the 2016 Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study agree and 88% understand that embracing digital technologies is necessary for survival.

And yet we find evidence most have not embraced “digital” with the level of priority and urgency that will give them a competitive advantage. Almost half still rely on paper and/or manual processes for maintaining their operational and transactional systems of record. And 71% to 82% still rely at least partially on spreadsheets or manual processes to plan and manage key elements of their businesses. Why is that?

Oftentimes it is because the “digital” hype focuses either on consumer technology (social, home, shopping, fitness, etc.) or is discussed at such an advanced (and abstract) level that your typical business leader just can’t figure out how to get from here to there.

Acumatica is looking to change that and its latest release of its cloud ERP, Acumatica 6, provides us with some good examples of how it is going about it.acumatica6

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Acumatica and the Power of Three

Three must be Acumatica’s lucky number. In reviewing all that was covered in a recent (industry) Analyst day, I was struck by how often things came in 3’s:

  • 3 types of partners
  • 3 cloud models
  • A goal to eliminate 3 C’s: cost, complexity and customization
  • 3 veteran Acumatica execs presenting alongside 3 relative newcomers
  • Even the customer in attendance had the Acumatica partner demo 3 different systems side by side and then was up and running in 3 months
  • That partner… typically does 3 integrations per installation

In the competitive world of ERP, it is often quite difficult for solution providers to differentiate themselves. Basic functionality has become somewhat of a commodity, although the basics aren’t so basic any more. Most vendors are responding to the dominant trends impacting enterprise applications… cloud, mobile, social and analytics (aka big data). And yet, differentiation was indeed the theme of the day for Jon Roskill, CEO (and one of the 3 relative newcomers to Acumatica, along with VP Partner Strategy and Enablement, Richard Duffy and brand new CMO Kathy Visser-May).

3 Types of Partners

Apart from the lengthy list of 3’s, Acumatica can claim one easy point of differentiation. Unlike most ERP vendors and definitely unlike other SaaS vendors, it sells exclusively through an indirect channel. And in keeping with the power of 3, Acumatica has 3 different kinds of partners: Value Added Resellers (VARs), Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) and OEMs. How does it define the difference?

Think of a VAR as a typical reseller of the Acumatica software. The “value add” might simply be the implementation and consulting services provided along with the purchase of the software. Or it might include some customization, or add-on functionality developed by the VAR. In providing this value add, the VAR might also be providing specific knowledge or expertise of a certain software, industry or country requirements. The VAR in attendance at the Analyst day, BHE Consulting, is quite typical in that it resells Acumatica along with 2 other applications, both on-premise solutions. BHE’s customer, Menck Windows truly appreciated this diversity as it allowed the evaluation team to work with a single partner, but look at 3 different solutions, side by side.

VAR revenue for Acumatica grew 70% last year, making it one of the fastest growing ERP companies today from a percentage standpoint. While the growth percentages are impressive, they are tempered by the fact that Acumatica is still small compared to key rivals like NetSuite, SAP and Microsoft Dynamics. Yet the company did announce its 1000th customer at its partner event last August – quite a significant milestone.

The value added by an ISV is more specific. An ISV adds value through extensions to the product. Some ISVs you might have heard of include: Avalara (for sales and use tax management), Adaptive Planning (for financial planning, budgeting and forecasting), ADP for payroll and more recently Magento for eCommerce software and platform. Others might expand the addressable market for Acumatica beyond its standard financial, distribution, project accounting and CRM. For example, JAAS Systems adds advanced manufacturing features to Acumatica’s solution. ISVs (like JAAS) might also be VARs and other VARs may also resell solutions from ISVs. Indeed any partner that sells to manufacturers today must also partner with JAAS for a complete solution.

OEMs are a little different. These companies will use Acumatica technology to build their own solutions, sold under their own brands. So Acumatica will be “under the covers” so to speak. The two most notable of these relationships are Visma, a provider of business software solutions to SMBs in Northern Europe and MYOB, an Australia and New Zealand-based company that enjoys market shares as high as 70% to 80% within its operating markets. The deal with MYOB, announced in August 2013, enables MYOB to localize and distribute Acumatica’s ERP solution. Visma offers Visma.net, a complete business solution including a white-labeled version of Acumatica’s ERP as a key component.

3 Cloud Models

Acumatica was developed as a cloud-based solution. It was born in a browser and therefore has always had a zero footprint on the client, making it accessible any time, from anywhere. No legacy issues here. It is built from the ground up with cloud technologies and can be run on a variety of cloud platforms including Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services (AWS), IBM cloud and CenturyLink.

The downside of being “all in the cloud” ordinarily means less choice. Typically a cloud-based solution is only available as software as a service (SaaS). Not so with Acumatica. The solution is designed to be a multi-tenant cloud solution, but that doesn’t prevent Acumatica from offering it in a variety of different environments and Acumatica is quite unique in this regard.

Acumatica offers 3 different models through its partners:

  • A traditional multi-tenant option where a single instance of the application can be load balanced for scalability
  • A multi-tenant application, but each tenant can have their own separate database
  • Single tenant, where the customer has a dedicated application and database.

While SaaS purists might argue against this kind of choice, the 2015 Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study found when it comes to cloud, not everyone wants the same thing (Figure 1).

Figure 1: How do you prefer your cloud?

Acumatica Fig 1Source: Mint Jutras 2015 Enterprise Solution Study

What is most important to Acumatica is that all 3 options use a single code base, which allows the company to deliver on another promise of 3: it schedules releases every 3 months. The ability to deliver more innovation is one of the benefits of a SaaS solution that is often overlooked and under-valued by consumers of ERP accustomed to upgrades being time-consuming, costly and disruptive. Acumatica has customers like this, and therefore it offers two different “tracks” for updates – quarterly and annually. Which leads us to another of the 3’s.

Eliminating the 3 C’s: Cost, Complexity and Customization

Most everyone today (including our Enterprise Solution Study participants) recognize the potential for cost savings in deploying a SaaS solution. Each year we include a question in our study regarding what respondents find appealing about SaaS. Cost savings consistently rise to the top of the leader board, including reduced total cost of ownership, less cost (and effort) of upgrades, lower hardware, maintenance and startup costs and fewer IT staff required to simply keep the lights on.

But in order to eliminate all 3 C’s (cost, complexity and customization) you need a solution that is broad and deep, yet flexible and agile. Building more and more specialized functionality into the core solution has the potential of turning it into a battleship – complex, unresponsive and hard to maneuver. Instead, Acumatica has made every effort to make its core solution generic but extensible.

By design, the core solution Acumatica itself delivers is a horizontal one, and therefore it will have functional gaps in certain vertical industries. Acumatica looks to OEMs and ISVs to fill the gaps, providing more opportunity for these partners and also shielding individual customers from having to deal with added complexity arising from specialty functionality that serves no purpose for them. Special platform technology helps Acumatica support this approach while making it easier for partners to extend the solution.

As with many modern solutions today, Acumatica has 3 layers: presentation, business logic and data access. Each can be modified through a “customization engine” that can extend the layer without touching original code or binaries. New functionality can be added through extension packages and multiple packages are supported on a single runtime version. The partners, or even the customers themselves, can create packages and they are “automagically” merged together. New data fields can be added and the entire database is split into base tables and extension tables. Even in a multi-tenant environment, different tenants have access to different extension packages and tables.

A good example of using ISVs to extend functionality is in the realm of eCommerce. Acumatica and Magento have partnered to help customers connect eCommerce to the back office functions supplied by Acumatica. This is a different approach than one of Acumatica’s key rivals, NetSuite, which has authored its own eCommerce suite. This is the classic example of weighing “best of breed” functionality versus ease of integration. While the NetSuite approach takes a tightly couple suite approach, Acumatica chose Magento as a market leading “best of breed” solution. That is not to say NetSuite’s SuiteCommerce solution will never match Magento in terms of functionality, but it still has a ways to go. And in the meantime Acumatica offers “out-of-the-box” integration and recognizes that some current Magento users will be reluctant to let go of that “best of breed” functionality and that specific solution.

Another example can be found in Acumatica’s approach to mobile applications. Acumatica has begun to deliver a small number (so far) of these specialized apps. One analyst at the recent event asked why not take a “mobile first” design approach, rather than creating add-on mobile apps? But for Acumatica, this is not an “either/or” approach, but rather “both.” The entire Acumatica ERP, being browser-based, is available from virtually any device with a Wifi connection. The additional mobile apps can be used in a disconnected mode, even when a Wifi connection is not available. Data is later synchronized automatically. So these mobile apps are in addition to (general access through a mobile device) and purpose-built for a particular function.

There is Power in Those 3’s

Being a relative newcomer to ERP, Acumatica has a ways to go before it becomes anything close to a household name. But then, for an industry as mature as ERP, there are indeed very few household names. If it were to rely on a direct sales force to grow its customer base one customer at a time, it might never reach the kind of penetration needed to be taken seriously. But with 327 VARs (200 in North America), OEMs like MYOB and Visma and ISVs like Avalara, Magento and Adaptive Planning, the company will definitely have a leg up.

With the cloud at its current tipping point (for new software acquisition at the very least), Acumatica is well positioned, offering choice, while also preserving the advantages of a cloud-based solution.

On the product side of the house, it has some stability with veterans like Mike Chtchelkonogov (founder and CTO), Ali Jani (VP Product Management and Services) and Gabriel Michaud (director of product management). While continuity is a key factor here, I expect the pace of innovation to accelerate, leveraging key partnerships and new technology.

And yet Acumatica has been smart to infuse some new blood into the organization with Jon Roskill (CEO) and Kathy Visser-May (CMO), both from Microsoft and Richard Duffy, recruited from SAP Business One. All 3 newcomers have pedigrees firmly rooted in the small to medium size business market, where Acumatica intends to stay. All are hungry – and well-equipped – to make a name for themselves and Acumatica in this rapidly changing, cloud-based world of ERP.

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What are you running your business with? Is it ERP?

Perhaps you’ve heard me ask the question, “Is it ERP?” about various solutions on the market. Maybe you were thinking, “Does it matter?” The answer to that question is, “Yes and no.” “No,” in that ERP, like any software category, is just that. It’s a category, a label and you shouldn’t read too much into that. “Yes,” in that the category is often misused and maligned.

While the acronym itself (short for enterprise resource planning) can be somewhat misleading, I have always been very clear on my definition of ERP:

ERP is an integrated suite of modules that form the operational and transactional system of record of the business.

The rest of the world doesn’t see it quite this clearly. Of course my definition is intentionally quite broad, but it needs to be simply because the operational and transactional needs will vary quite significantly depending on the very nature of the business. You can’t run a service business like a manufacturing or distribution business. Retailers, government and non-profits all have their own unique requirements.

This situation is also clearly exasperated by the fact that the footprint of ERP has grown to the point where it is getting more and more difficult to determine where ERP ends and other applications begin. Functions like performance management, talent and human capital management, etc, that used to sit squarely outside of ERP, today might sit either inside or outside that boundary. While operational accounting has long been a core competency of ERP, more robust financial management can be an integral part of ERP, or a stand-alone solution. Likewise, the footprint of solutions that have traditionally been marketed as financial and accounting solutions have expanded as well. No wonder there is so much confusion out there.

As a result, I thought it would be a good idea this year to see what people actually think they are using to run their businesses. While I have been conducting an annual ERP survey since 2006, much of the data I collect is relevant to other solution providers as well, particularly those that focus primarily on finance and accounting, with perhaps some project management and/or human resource management included. So this year I changed the name of the study to the Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study and added a new question at the very beginning.

Question: Which of the following best describes the software you use to manage your business?

  • Primarily enterprise level finance and accounting solutions (might include project management and/or human capital management)
  • Integrated enterprise level finance and accounting solutions supplemented with other operational applications (e.g. inventory, warehouse management, etc.)
  • An integrated suite of modules that provides a full system of record of our business (often referred to as ERP)
  • Desktop solutions such as Quicken, QuickBooks, Peachtree, etc.
  • Mostly spreadsheets and/or some low-cost or free tools (Google apps, Zoho, etc.)
  • Don’t Know

While data collection is still underway, we have collected almost 300 responses thus far and the results are quite interesting.

Note that participants checking spreadsheets and “Don’t Know” were disqualified and therefore will not be represented in any results. While those running desktop solutions qualified, only 1 participant checked this option and therefore I will only include the first three listed above in our discussion here.

During the course of the survey, participants are asked to check off all the different accounting/ERP solutions they have implemented across their entire enterprises and then asked to select one of those and answer implementation and performance questions for that specific solution. While 84% of the participants selected a solution that is clearly marketed as ERP, only 33% of this segment selected the third option above, which is reflective of the Mint Jutras definition of ERP. So they have purchased an ERP solution, but by my definition, they aren’t running ERP.

The remaining 16% selected solutions that are generally marketed as finance and accounting solutions. And yet 21% of these participants described the solution they were running as an integrated suite that provides a complete system of record of their business (i.e. ERP). So it would appear the majority of those running full ERP solutions are not making the most of what they have. And at least one in five of those running solutions primarily marketed as accounting solutions seem to have all they need to run their businesses. The full breakdown of responses is summarized in Figure 1.

Figure 1: What runs your business?

Figure 1 Blog postSource: 2015 Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study

These (somewhat surprising) results caused me to dive a little deeper, looking for, if not an explanation, at least a pattern. This early sample represented a pretty diverse group with the largest representation from manufacturing (41%) and service related businesses (36%). Given ERP evolved from MRP (material requirements planning), one would expect a higher adoption rate and more mature ERP implementations in manufacturers. While very few manufacturers run the solutions marketed primarily as finance and accounting solutions, 41% indicated the software running the business was primarily a finance and accounting solution. Another 26% had integrated finance and accounting solutions supplemented with other operational solutions such as inventory and warehouse management, presumably purchased from another vendor or a partner of their ERP solution provider. Again, only 33% described their implementation as full ERP. So no, manufacturers are not ahead of the pack.

I also looked at individual solution providers where I had a sample of at least 20 responses for smaller vendors or 40+ for larger ones. What segments were most likely to be running an integrated suite that provides a full system of record? The answer: Those running solutions that specifically target small to mid-size businesses. Does this mean small and mid-size businesses were more likely to describe what they were running as ERP? Not necessarily. It depends a lot on the solution provider and the solution itself.

Sixty-eight percent (68%) of those running Aptean’s solutions and 67% of those running SAP Business One described what they were running as ERP, per the definition above. Those running Acumatica’s cloud-based solution were also more likely to do so at 55%. And yet those running any of the four Microsoft Dynamics ERP solutions (AX, NAV, GP, SL), all of which target small to midsize enterprises (SMEs), were less likely, with only 28% indicating they were running a full ERP. Instead, they were more likely to report running integrated enterprise level finance and accounting solutions supplemented with other operational applications. My guess is that the partners that sold them the Dynamics solution (note: all Dynamics solutions are sold exclusively through partners) provide these other operational applications. Yet clearly these add-on’s are not so fully embedded and seamlessly integrated that they appear to simply be part of the ERP solution.

This is in stark contrast to solutions sold by Intacct partners, where I have noted previously that it is nearly impossible to distinguish where Intacct ends and the partner solution begins. As a result, 23% of Intacct customers indicated they were running an integrated suite that provides a full system of record, even though Intacct doesn’t portray its solution as ERP. It is one of those financial and accounting solution providers.

Another factor at play here is the whole concept of 2-tier ERP implementations. A full 85% of our survey respondents operate in more than one location and 69% are multi-national enterprises. This lends itself to the scenario where each operating location (division, subsidiary, business unit, etc.) may be run as a business all on its own. In fact if these units are in different countries they are also separate legal entities, requiring their own P&Ls. So you might have one system running at corporate headquarters (HQ) and other systems running the divisions.

The requirements at corporate HQ are largely financial, particularly if all orders are placed and fulfilled at the divisional level. This contributes to a larger percentage of respondents only running financials.

In days gone by these operating units might have been left to their own devices to find a solution to help them run their individual operations. Those days are long gone though. Today, 96% of our survey participants with multiple locations have established corporate standards and 64% of the time these are multi-tier standards, meaning a different ERP is used at the divisional level than at corporate. But even with a corporate financial solution in place, divisions still need some sort of finance and accounting in order to roll up to corporate. You can push the corporate financials down to the divisional level and then supplement them with other operational solutions. Or you can implement a full ERP at the divisional level and then integrate the divisional ERP with corporate financials.

This alone could be a very good reason why SAP Business One customers are more likely to be running a fully integrated suite. Of course if they are truly a small stand-alone business, they need a complete solution and probably don’t have the budget to be looking for disparate solutions that need to be integrated. Even if they are part of a large corporate enterprise, there is a pretty good chance corporate is running some version of SAP ERP. Because SAP Business One is pre-integrated with SAP ERP, the division has an integrated suite of modules providing a full system of record of the division’s business, that also happens to roll up to corporate financials.

With this as a likely scenario, you might think that the vast majority of SAP ERP customers are simply running integrated financials. They are not. Only 19% reported running primarily enterprise level finance and accounting, while 29% reported running integrated financials and other operational applications and a (relatively) impressive 52% reported running full ERP. Many assume SAP, being the 800-pound gorilla and therefore open to attack, is so complex and hard to implement that many never get beyond the basics of accounting. Yet in comparison to others, it is actually more likely to provide that full system of record.

This is not the case with Oracle, the other giant in the ERP industry. Almost half (46%) of Oracle users participating in the survey characterize their implementations as primarily accounting and only 28% describe them as ERP.

So while I would like to conclude that I found a distinct and recognizable pattern in all this data, the bottom line is that implementations vary quite significantly, particularly in comparing different solution providers. I am excited to have the beginnings of this new and extensive data set and look forward to sharing other insights as we move through the data collection and analysis phases.

Solution providers interested in collecting data from your own installed bases, feel free to contact me directly at cindy@mintjutras.com. There is still time but the window of opportunity will be closing soon!

 

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Acumatica Poised as ERP Trends Converge

 

Partners Attracted by Technology, Innovation and Choice

Acumatica held its annual Partner Summit earlier this week in Broomfield, CO, just outside of Denver. Attendance this year topped 400, with over 100 partner companies represented. Over the past year Acumatica has undergone some management changes, bringing in a new CEO and a new head of partner strategy, a key role considering 100% of its sales are indirect. There was a definite sense of excitement in the air this year, partly as a result of the new management, but largely due to a combination of technology, innovation and choice of cloud-based deployment options offered in response to the latest trends impacting Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP).

Mint Jutras has been writing a lot about four specific trends this year. Its report, 2014 Trends in ERP Converge, looked back over these “big trends” in enterprise software from 2013 and concluded that we don’t need any new or different trends for ERP in 2014. Cloud, mobile, social and big data will do just fine. However, we have concluded that it is no longer sufficient to treat them as independent movements. We need them to converge around a single common goal of making ERP easier to consume, thus bringing more value to the business. Enlisting the aid of OEM and VAR partners, Acumatica has set its sights on delivering on this promise of added value.

The Key Trends

As I have noted before (but it is worth repeating), the 2014 Trends in ERP Converge report talked about four specific trends. These should come as no surprise to anyone following enterprise software:

  • Cloud and software as a service (SaaS)
  • Mobile access and the consumerization of IT
  • “Social” as a way to deliver collaboration, connectivity and visibility
  • “Big data” for intelligence and decision-making

It is impossible to talk about the convergence of these trends without mentioning innovation that is easier to consume in a less disruptive way. This often requires new ways of engaging with ERP in order to change the whole ERP customer experience. So how does Acumatica address each of these trends?

Pure Cloud

Acumatica can be characterized as a pure cloud solution. The Acumatica solution was born in a browser and therefore has always had a zero footprint on the client, making it accessible any time, from anywhere. No legacy issues here. It is built from the ground up with cloud technologies: SOAP, web services, HTML5, Azure, Amazon, etc.

Many use the terms “cloud” and “SaaS” interchangeably, but indeed they are not the same. The distinction is quite simple and need not be over-complicated:

  • Cloud refers to access to computing, software, storage of data over a network (generally the Internet.) You may have purchased a license for the software and installed it on your own computers or those owned and managed by another company, but your access is through the Internet and therefore through the “cloud,” whether private or public.
  • SaaS is exactly what is implied by what the acronym stands for: Software as a Service. Software is delivered only as a service. It is not delivered on a CD or other media to be loaded on your own (or another’s) computer. It is accessed over the Internet and is generally paid for on a subscription basis. It does not reside on your computers at all.

Using these definitions, we can confidently say all SaaS is cloud computing, but not all cloud computing is SaaS. Acumatica is cloud-based but not always delivered as SaaS.

The downside of being “cloud only” often means less choice. Typically a cloud-based solution is only available as software as a service (SaaS). Not so with Acumatica. Lots of choices here: multi-tenant SaaS, single tenant SaaS (more like a hosted model), or even traditional on-premise deployments. You can purchase a perpetual license or pay a subscription. It is designed to be a multi-tenant cloud solution, but that doesn’t prevent Acumatica from offering it in a variety of different environments and Acumatica is quite unique in this regard.

Some industry observers, including those that have their own specific definition of what constitutes “true SaaS,” might argue against this approach. While Mint Jutras is seeing a major shift in acceptance of SaaS solutions, our research also proves that there is  continued interest in other delivery options for the access any time, from anywhere advantages of the cloud. But we see a decided decline in interest in traditional, licensed on-premise solutions (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Which deployment methods would you consider today?

Figure 1 AcumaticaSource: Mint Jutras 2011, 2013 and 2014 ERP Solution Studies

Many are simply looking to unburden themselves from the care and feeding of enterprise apps like ERP. They are attracted by lower costs, easier upgrades, less hardware and IT staff and are less worried about a single prescription of how cloud solutions are delivered. They are looking for business partners they can trust and having more choices in how they address these needs can be very attractive.

However, Acumatica does sacrifice some of the advantages of a pure multi-tenant solution through this approach. For those not familiar with the terminology, Mint Jutras uses the following simple definitions:

  • Multi-tenant SaaS: Multiple companies use the same instance of (hosted) software. Configuration settings will vary per company and data is protected from access by other companies (tenants).
  • Single-tenant (or Multi-instance) SaaS: Each company is given its own instance of the (hosted) software.

Those vendors that only support a multi-tenant environment have the luxury of maintaining one single line of code. By not having to worry about multiple instances at different (potentially customized) version levels, they are better positioned to deliver more innovation, faster.

However, at the Partner Summit, Acumatica announced a new Acumatica Grow Program, which leverages the multi-tenant capabilities of its solution within the partner community. FusionRMS for SMB Retail is one example.

Fusion Retail Management System (FusionRMS) is a suite of applications extending the reach of Acumatica to the SMB retail and wholesale distribution markets. Offering added functionality such as point of sale (POS) and warehouse management (WMS), its solutions are seamlessly integrated with Acumatica without effecting core functionality. Now, through the Grow Program, it is also offering multi-tenant SaaS back office accounting supported through Amazon Web Services (AWS).

While this might sacrifice some of the flexibility of choice other Acumatica customers enjoy, Fusion Retail Management manages a single line of code and can pass along savings to its customers. This helps them support clients that otherwise might not be able to afford Acumatica.

Fusion Retail Management not only sells direct, but also other partners bring them small retail clients that might be too small for Acumatica now. This is preferable to simply losing a deal, particularly in knowing they will get them back if the prospect grows. FusionRMS supports these small clients until they grow large enough to justify the purchase or subscription of Acumatica. At that point, FusionRMS turns the client back over to the partner.

A Mobile Framework

The trend towards mobile goes hand-in-hand with cloud, as mobile access is gained through web-enabled services. We are seeing different approaches to mobility in the ERP market these days. Some vendors are adopting a “mobile first” design approach. Any features and functions are being designed to “fit” on the real estate of a tablet or smart phone. Others are taking a “mobile apps” approach where they are releasing multiple, individual purpose-built apps that complement core ERP. Some are building these themselves and others are leaving this development effort to partners. Some are hosting “App stores” where customers can shop. Others simply bundle them into existing software licenses.

Acumatica is taking the approach of providing a mobile development framework, purposely leaving the actual delivery of the mobile apps to the partners in order to provide them more opportunity. But this framework isn’t built for a developer. According to CTO Mike Chtchelkonogov (aka Mike C), “You no longer have to be a developer to target the mobile market. In the past, partners may have needed to hire specialists to create iOS or Android applications, but with Acumatica’s new mobile development framework, any of our partners can do it.”

This is especially important to the Acumatica channel because many partners are business and implementation specialists and not technologists. According to Mike C, the partner [or the customer] can take any part of Acumatica and expose it on the mobile device. So what kind of opportunity are we talking about? That might be in delivering a customized solution through services, or building an app to be sold through Acumatica’s app store.

What About Big Data and Social?

There was not a lot of direct reference to “social” and “big data” at the Acumatica Partner Summit. But that doesn’t mean either is being ignored, only that these trends and concepts are being worked into the product roadmap naturally, not as separate and distinct efforts. In fact many of the new features of its upcoming new release 5.0 indirectly support the goals of a “social” enterprise.

Social can mean different things to different people. It has some intuitive connotations in the world of consumer goods where social sentiment can have a serious impact, both positively and negatively, when shared publicly. But the real impact in any industry, while perhaps not as intuitive, is quite real.

When you take the view that “social” should mean improved collaboration, visibility and connectivity, then you start to understand the connection with the ERP user experience. Much of the development effort that produced the latest release 5.0 has gone into the user experience. Probably the best testament to the result was the fact that several key top executives put their hands on keyboards, or their own mobile devices, and ran their own demos. Not only were these “real” demos (not mock-ups or a series of screen shots in PowerPoint), but no pre-sale consultant or sales engineer was needed.

Simply by putting access to an ERP directly in the hands of high-level decision-makers improves connectivity, which in turn fosters visibility and collaboration.

Another announcement at the Partner Summit reinforced Acumatica’s commitment to another type of connectivity: a deep partnership with Azuqua, a cloud connectivity platform. On stage Azugua demonstrated its recently launched cloud integration service featuring connectivity between a broad range of popular web services (including Salesforce, Office 365 and Hubspot) to Acumatica’s system. Interestingly enough, the integration demonstrated on the main stage was so dead simple that it led to skepticism from industry observers and influencers in the audience. Was it too good to be true? I suspect it is real, but time and partner experience will tell.

As to “big data,” Acumatica was quick to point out its approach was very different from those of ERP giants SAP and Oracle. Instead of building a “big data” platform outside of the ERP system and requiring retrofitting of existing systems, Acumatica is building this kind of capability into its solution. This speaks to speed and ease of handling large volumes of structured data, but downplays (ignores?) the inclusion of massive volumes of unstructured data. It appears this is also something Acumatica might leave to partners and it will take a special kind of partner to deliver on this.

The Convergence of Trends Toward a Goal

If you recall, in our intro, the goal was to have these trends converge around a single common goal of making ERP easier to consume. The better the experience, the more connected the people running the businesses are to ERP and to each other. In fact over the past few years, we’ve observed an increase in the percentage of employees who actually use ERP. Today that percent is about 55%, up from about 20% less than a decade ago. In addition, 62% of survey participants claim top-level executives have direct access to and regularly use ERP. So Acumatica executives are not the only execs in the driver seat when it comes to using ERP. Another 30% indicate these high level execs have at least some access to ERP.

This, combined with expectations raised by the consumerization of IT, is perhaps the catalyst in shifting priorities in terms of ERP evaluations. While fit and functionality was king for many years, it has slipped to number two in the priority of selection criteria. “Ease of use” has taken the number one spot.

But “ease of use” means different things to different people. In fact it means different things to a single individual (Figure 2).

Figure 2: What does ease of use mean? (top 3 priorities)

Figure 2 AcumaticaSource: Mint Jutras 2014 ERP Solution Study

While many vendors are focusing efforts on “beautiful” software these days, beauty is always subjective. Those using ERP today are more concerned about efficiency and productivity than in a visually appealing user interface. Being a relative new-comer to ERP, Acumatica (founded in 2007) might not have the same depth of features that other more mature solutions have. But the development team seems to be working on a good balance of features and functions, along with better usability and a web platform that helps partners further develop breadth and depth. If the reaction to the main stage demos is any indication, partners and the few customers in attendance at the Partner Summit agree.

Ehrin Dimitry, CEO of AME Corporation, an Acumatica customer said, “I thought I knew what our next steps were until I saw Acumatica 5.0. My wheels are turning!” Customers and partners seemed genuinely excited about this newest release, a clear indication of perceived value.

Summary and Key Takeaways

As a pure cloud solution provider, Acumatica is very well positioned to deliver the benefits of the cloud through a variety of different deployment options. Virtually every partner I spoke with at the Partner Summit was drawn to Acumatica for its technology. Few offer Acumatica exclusively and many of them have experience selling, implementing, servicing or developing other ERP platforms. But that seemed only to strengthen their opinion of and commitment to the Acumatica solution. They like the partner friendliness of a relatively small company that sells exclusively through the channel. They are drawn to cloud computing but like being able to offer choice.

Customers and partners alike were enthusiastic about the latest release and the roadmap forward. Overall Acumatica seems poised to deliver as major trends like cloud, mobile, social and big data start to converge.

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