Automation

Plex Smart Manufacturing Platform

                                                                                    May 2020

Headache Relief in Times of Crisis

Manufacturers today face extraordinary challenges as the world is plunged into an unprecedented crisis. Even as we see efforts to recover, everyone was and is affected, though not necessarily in the same way. Some industries were completely shut down while others (think software and professional services) could close offices and still remain at least somewhat productive. Manufacturing lies at both ends of the spectrum. Obviously you can’t make industrial or consumer products from home – at least not at scale. But within the realm of manufacturing, we see a widely diverse impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, depending on what is being manufactured. Cloud computing and advanced technology that supports connectivity, collaboration, automation and agility have eased the burden for some, while others struggle (still) amidst shelter-in-place orders that caught many flat-footed.

Those companies operating on the Plex Smart Manufacturing Platform are among the more fortunate, whether they are manufacturing products deemed “essential” or not. Of course no piece of software can fully address the crisis of needing to completely shut down production. But even those businesses still have cash to collect and customers to support. As administrative and support personnel were locked out of their offices, Plex’s native Software as a Service (SaaS) deployments allowed employees to start working from home immediately. And as many manufacturers have had to pivot their businesses, efforts from Plex over the past several years to provide automation, collaboration capabilities and an added level of agility are all paying off.

For anyone who still questioned the value of cloud, SaaS and digital transformation at the beginning of 2020, the words of Plex Systems CEO, Bill Berutti, should ring true. “This crisis is shining a whole new light on the power of technology and the power of smart manufacturing, to make us more agile in times of crisis, to allow us to adapt.” Let’s take a look at a few of the ways Plex’s solution provides some relief from the headaches that come along with this crisis.

SaaS Proves its Value

Let’s start with the obvious. The capability to access anytime, from anywhere is inherent in software solutions that are accessed via the cloud and delivered as a service. Mint Jutras has been extolling the benefits of cloud computing and software as a service (SaaS) for many years now, but in spite of all the hype associated with cloud and SaaS, we still see evidence that many don’t fully understand the difference between the two or the benefits SaaS can bring. Whether you run a solution on your own premises or in a private or public cloud, the ability to access anytime, from anywhere is a significant advantage and web-enablement opens the door for the kind of connectivity you need as workers work from home. The ability to connect is critical, but how you connect is equally important. This issue surfaces when suddenly office workers became remote, work-from-home workers.

One of Plex’s customers, Accuride, provides the perfect example. Accuride primarily makes steel and aluminum wheels for the heavy trucking industry. As a global company that made a recent acquisition in Europe, Accuride runs the Plex Smart Manufacturing Platform in some of its divisions, but not all. While workers in the locations using Plex were able to start working from home almost immediately, it took several days of frantic work to support remote workers where solutions were still on premise. The recently acquired division in Germany is still running an SAP solution on premise. It needed to upgrade from 100 VPN connections to support 250 newly remote users very quickly – not an easy task. This only served to validate Accuride’s strategy to move to the cloud and SaaS.

Trojan Battery is another example. A longstanding Plex customer, it completed its shift to SaaS at the end of 2018. It not only runs Plex, but also Dropbox, RingCentral, Workday and Salesforce. But the company was subsequently acquired by C&D Technologies, which still uses on-premise solutions. While Trojan Battery employees were able to take their laptops and mobile devices or just sit down at their home computers and have full and immediate access to the same data and systems they had in their offices, those from C&D Technologies that were still using on-premise applications had a much different experience. They needed access through a VPN, which proved to be a significant pain point, especially for those employees who had never before been issued a laptop (having no need for one). As IT Director Matt Irey points out, “We can’t open our corporate network up to unsecured machines, so they’ve got to be using company equipment.”

This also raised the issue of network performance. Mr. Irey goes on to say, “There’s limited bandwidth — guaranteed Plex, Workday, Dropbox, have a heck of a lot more bandwidth than I do going into my location.”

Plex was an early pioneer of SaaS. It has offered its solution exclusively as a multi-tenant SaaS solution since 2001, long before cloud and SaaS were even part of the vocabulary of the typical manufacturer. Back then most manufacturers weren’t even knowingly and willingly considering SaaS. And so, for many years, the company was successful in spite of, rather than because of its pioneering efforts in SaaS. The key to this success lies in offering a more complete solution for manufacturing, stretching beyond the typical boundaries of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP).

The 4 Pillars of Smart Manufacturing

This has led it to its current offering, the Plex Smart Manufacturing Platform, a rather unique combination of ERP, Manufacturing Execution (MES), Manufacturing Operations Management (MOM), supply chain management, industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and analytics.

What makes the platform a “Smart” platform is data, often described as the “new oil” or the most valuable resource of today. Plex recognizes that the four pillars of a Smart Manufacturing Platform are:

  • to connect and integrate to data sources (including machine data)
  • to automate (processes and data collection)
  • to track (and trace)
  • and analyze that data

In addition, the system, along with the data, must also be available, reliable, scalable, secure and agile. Over the years Plex has excelled in areas like availability and reliability. Its service level agreement (SLA) promises 99.99% availability and it has delivered 99.996% availability over the last four years, with an average of just 22 minutes of unplanned downtime each year. With those statistics on the books, along with an impressive track record of security, last year it decided to focus more heavily on agility.

The Increased Need for Agility

The need for agility has been on the rise for the past several years. We live in disruptive times.

Figure 1: How much risk do you face in your industry being disrupted?

Source: Mint Jutras 2018 Enterprise Solution Study

Back in 2018, the Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study found 89% of manufacturers believed they faced some level of risk in their businesses and/or industries being disrupted by new innovative products, new ways of selling or pricing existing products or services, entirely new business models, or some combination of all of the above. And then of course there were (and still are) the more traditional disruptive factors like expansion and growth, organizational restructuring and regulatory changes, just to name a few. And now… a global pandemic.

While different industries and individual companies face an incredibly diverse range of challenges, there is one constant today, and that is an element of uncertainty. No one really knows what the “new normal” will be. Some Plex customers have already had to pivot their businesses very quickly.

As noted earlier, this global crisis has impacted different industries in very different ways. While some making products that are not deemed “essential” have been forced to close, others are struggling to keep up with higher demand. Select food, beverage and personal care products are experiencing a boost in demand. Manufacturers of medical supplies and equipment (think ventilators and face masks) are facing increased demand that can far exceed capacity. Others making industrial or non-essential consumer products are forced to re-tool and ramp up production for new and different products. We see hair care manufacturers making hand sanitizer and automotive suppliers making ventilators or personal protective equipment (PPE).

Each option brings its own set of challenges, often requiring new supply sources and processes that include shop floor redesign or limiting capacity to create social distancing. Some are responding quickly, but many are not, as evidenced by shortages of staples like toilet paper, disinfectants, flour and other necessities. We’ve seen evidence of brittle supply chains and manufacturers that remain rigid and inflexible. While enterprise software solutions can’t (all by themselves) overcome all these hurdles, they certainly can contribute to the pain or ease the burden as innovative companies undergo a paradigm shift.

One Less thing to Worry About in Shifting Gears

Creative Foam, another Plex customer, is one manufacturer that has quickly pivoted its business. The company turned 50 years old this year and specializes in foams, nonwovens and adhesives in industries that include transportation and healthcare. Creative Foam engineers seek to create products that are quieter, stronger and lighter.

But in the wake of the crisis, the company was able to quickly shift gears. Tareq Falah, Vice President of Information Technology and Information Systems tells us, “Nobody had a crystal ball. No one could have predicted anything that is going on now during this COVID crisis – not when, not who, not how. Before, we had always asked ourselves, ‘What can we do to win business?’ But in response to this crisis, we went through a paradigm shift. Now we ask, ‘What else can we do to help?’”

Essentially Tareq was talking about helping the front-line workers in the field of medicine. They began with PPE, face shields to be more precise. This meant sourcing new materials, coming up with an initial design and then refining that design. And throughout this pivot, office workers went home to work. While there were many issues to resolve like getting people laptops and rerouting phones, according to Tareq, “We didn’t have to worry about Plex. Support of our business has been phenomenal.”

Another success story in responding to this global crisis is Olde Thompson. Founded in 1944, the company started out manufacturing houseware products, including salt and pepper mills. Today 80% of its business is in the powders that might go into the original products, including salt, pepper and a wide array of spices. While other businesses have slowed or stopped production, Olde Thompson has doubled its monthly output in response to increased demand.

Plex’s inventory management capabilities and its supply chain planning tool were key to Olde Thompson’s ability to respond to this spike in demand while its competitors simply could not react as quickly. When India shut down all spice manufacturing, Olde Thompson was able to locate and engage with other suppliers. This opened the door to acquiring three new customers. Being able to quickly bring on new customers using Plex’s new Smart EDI, a more scalable and flexible approach to onboarding new customers, meant this new business was not just a short-term blip, but the beginning of long-term relationships with three new customers.

But the real key to winning this new business was in Olde Thompson’s ability to ramp up production quickly. And the key to that was integration – pulling data out of machinery and automating machine setups using data within Plex. Process improvement is a key focus looking forward and Olde Thompson will be relying on Plex to provide visibility to their yields and support continuous improvement and long-term growth.

Speaking of Supply Chain Planning…

Plex also recently made another announcement that will assist customers in reducing the risk associated with market volatility, a subject that can strike fear in the hearts of many manufacturers today. On May 14,2020 it announced the release of the Plex Market Forecast Manager, now part of the Plex Supply Chain Planning Suite. Creating and maintaining a viable forecast has always been hard, but the uncertainty introduced with the COVID-19 makes it even more difficult.

According to Plex:

“Plex Market Forecast Manager enables manufacturers to integrate internal and external data points alongside demand plans to drive more accurate inventory decisions, gain market share, and evaluate and scale the supply chain. The initial release will provide automated access to IHS Markit’s Light Vehicle Forecast, helping automotive manufacturers form more accurate and timely forecasts. IHS Markit is a world leader in critical information, analytics, and solutions for the major industries and markets that drive economies worldwide.”

While the initial release of this new module specifically targets the automotive industry, perhaps Olde Thompson will not immediately benefit, but we suspect it will be able to at some point down the road. One of the industries IHS Markit follows is agribusiness, which of course supplies the food, beverage… and spice market.

Focus on Automation

Beyond the ability to connect, another of the four pillars on which the Plex Smart Manufacturing Platform is built is automation. Certainly, automation also plays a key role in alleviating some of the pain associated with the COVID-19 crisis. For decades now manufacturing has been investing in automation on the shop floor. Automation can speed production, eliminate variability, improve quality and reduce costs. An unfortunate side effect has been that it has also cost some jobs. But in all fairness, it has also created jobs, although these new jobs require different skills.

Now in the midst of a global pandemic, when the health and safety of workers is top of the list in terms of priorities, there is a silver lining in the reduction in workers required to keep production running. If you simply need a handful of employees to monitor automated production, those employees are more likely to be able to maintain acceptable social distancing and product continues to be produced. And now as this automation (think robots, PLCs, mechanical devices) are increasingly connected to the Internet, taking advantage of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), perhaps production can be monitored remotely. Even remedial work might be done through augmented reality, with limited staff on site.

Plex’s engineering team, led by CTO Jerry Foster, is constantly investigating and experimenting with leading edge technology including augmented reality (think hands free and/or remote monitoring and even remote repair). Those investigative efforts also led to the acquisition of DATTUS in 2018 to accelerate IIoT adoption through connectivity, data management and data analysis.

But there is more to automation than machines and robots on the shop floor. There are many processes that must occur in the back and front offices of manufacturers that can be streamlined and automated, freeing office workers from repetitive tasks. And therefore, on May 14,2020, Plex announced Robotic Process Automation (RPA) can now be added on to the Plex Smart Manufacturing Platform through a new partnership with business technology solution provider Thirdware

An early adopter Plex customer Stant Corporation, a tier-1 automotive supplier of thermal and vapor management parts, worked with Plex and Thirdware to implement RPA to manage its invoice delivery. This was a labor-intensive and error-prone process, spread across multiple technology solutions. With the help of a bot on the Plex Smart Manufacturing Platform, Stant has been able to reduce its invoice backlog from three weeks to four days, with 100% data entry accuracy. Now, 80% of invoices are able to move to processing without intervention, enabling the Stant team to focus on more valuable problem-solving activities. And of course, a bot never has to move to a remote working location during a global pandemic.  After this first (successful) application of the technology, Stant went on to work with Plex and Thirdwave to create more. It now uses multiple bots for accounts payable, accounts receivable, customer service, and supply chain processes.

Summary and Recommendations

Manufacturers across the globe face many different challenges as the world tries to emerge from a global pandemic. Depending on where you live, the worst may be over. Or not. And even as we see signs of recovery, there is a high likelihood that things will never go back to exactly the way they were before. These factors combined reinforce the one common theme that confronts us all: uncertainty.

One thing is certain. As the communication and interaction around the world continues down the path of becoming more digital and more virtual, cloud computing and advanced technology that supports connectivity, collaboration, automation and agility step out of the realm of “nice to have” and become table stakes. Those manufacturers operating on the Plex Smart Manufacturing Platform are fortunate in that the solution that runs their businesses allowed them to immediately support workers remotely.  Plex also continues to innovate to bring more automation, to connect and integrate, to track and analyze.

If you are a Plex customer today, our advice is to hold the fort and continue to consume as much innovation as Plex can throw your way. If you are not a Plex customer and you are still struggling to connect newly remote workers, if you don’t have the agility to support whatever the new normal way of operating becomes, you might be thinking implementing a new ERP, MES, or MOM solution is the last thing you want to tackle right now. You could be dead wrong. If business is slow, take advantage of the down time. It’s okay to be dead wrong. It’s not okay to let your business die.

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The Secret Benefits of ERP You Can’t Afford to Ignore

                                                                                    April 2020

And the Key to Unlocking Them

Is the ERP that is running your business able to help you effectively achieve your goals in the current market? Does it take advantage of the kind of advanced technology that we have all come to rely on in our personal lives? Is it agile and flexible? Does it adapt easily to our rapidly changing world? Does it provide the level of connectivity needed to successfully operate in today’s global, digital economy? Or are you running a solution that may have once been state of the art, the best of the best available at the time, but is now stuck – stuck on an older release because of customizations that built barriers to innovation? Or stuck because you simply can’t justify the cost and effort of upgrading for the limited business benefit, because you’ll still be constrained by older technology?

If you are indeed stuck, your best path forward is most likely replacing it. But for decades ERP replacement was likened to brain surgery. It was reserved for dire cases only. “Rip and replace” was to be avoided at all costs. Today these perceptions are just as outdated as the solutions to which they apply. Yes, early ERP solutions were rigid and inflexible, limited in functionality, hard to install and implement and even harder to use. Innovation was painfully slow due to rigid architectures and older technology.

You can’t really blame those early solutions or the software companies that created them. The kind of technology needed for flexibility, ease of use and agility simply didn’t exist, making those conclusions justified. Why go through all the blood, sweat and tears, not to mention the cost, of implementing a newer solution just to wind up right back where you started?

But the world, and your business continued to change, and so have newer, next generation ERP solutions. Solutions now are far more flexible and technology-enabled, provide many more features and functions, are easier to install, easier to implement and easier to use. They bring far more benefits than ever before, but for those with lingering (mis)perceptions about ERP today, they remain hidden. And in today’s fast-moving, global, digital economy, you simply can’t afford to ignore them. The key to unlocking these secret benefits is in understanding the potential and then mapping out a plan to realize them.

Advanced Technology Holds the Key

What makes today’s next generation ERP so different? A variety of different type of advanced technologies can be embedded in enterprise applications today. It is through these kinds of embedded technologies that new ERP systems provide additional value. Of course, some vendors do a better job than others in leveraging them, and hence provide more value than others. This is why I’ve included a section later that provides some insight on how to best evaluate ERP solutions in order to ensure success. In the meantime, Table 1 presents some results from my 2019 Enterprise Solution Study, on the perceived value of several of these technologies. Note this study collected feedback from 464 survey respondents from companies of all shapes and sizes.

Table 1: Perceived Value of Advanced Technologies

Source: Mint Jutras 2019 Enterprise Solution Study

While a growing percentage of respondents perceive these technologies as providing strong value, on average (across all) 30% are unsure of the value. Essentially, they are saying, “Show me.” More than one in five (22%) see little or no value and another 10% simply don’t know. And therefore, it falls to industry experts and the vendors themselves to educate their audiences in order to prove the value and unlock these secrets. Let’s start that process by exploring a few of these.

Platforms and Architecture

Development platforms and microservices architectures, on which applications are built, provide the perfect example of those secret benefits. For the reader with a technical background, a microservice architecture is defined (by Wikipedia) as an architectural style that structures an application as a collection of loosely coupled services. For those nontechnical readers, think of it as constructing a solution from a set of Lego building blocks.

Think about how you build a structure from Legos. Each Lego block is made of the same kind of material and is attached (connected) to the other Lego blocks the same way. In many ways they are interchangeable. But by choosing different colors and sizes, and connecting them with a different design, you can make a structure that is very unique. And once constructed, if you want to change it, decoupling some of the blocks and replacing them doesn’t destroy the parts that are not affected. There is far less disruption introduced than if you had constructed it with a hammer and nails.

These platforms and technologies provide a level of agility, configurability and extensibility to today’s applications to help us respond to change.

Cloud and SaaS

We see more interest in cloud enablement and Software as a Service (SaaS). Indeed, whether you run a solution on your own premises or in a private or public cloud, the ability to access anytime, from anywhere is a significant advantage and cloud-enablement opens the door for the kind of connectivity you need as a full and active participant in the digital economy. Yet still, last year only half of our survey participants perceive it as bringing strong value. We suspect that if we were to ask this question today, given the current need for distancing and remote work, this might change.

But there are other benefits to moving to the cloud in general and SaaS in particular. We see subscriptions to software rapidly replacing the traditional license. When you license a copy of the software you take on the responsibility for maintenance and upgrades. This is especially important in light of the fact that when asked to select the top three challenges in achieving maximum value from ERP, “cost and disruption of upgrades prevent us from innovating” was at the very top of the list, selected by 40% of our respondents. With a SaaS solution, the solution provider assumes that responsibility and does the heavy lifting for you.

Artificial Intelligence

Technologies like machine learning, natural language processing and other forms of artificial intelligence have become quite prevalent in consumer technology (think Siri and Alexa, or GPS that learns your favorite route). Now is the time to bring them into the enterprise, much like they were insinuated into our personal lives – by adding value and embedding them.

Apple customers didn’t demand the ability to converse with their mobile devices. Apple just delivered it, not as an option and certainly not without adding to the cost. But they didn’t charge extra for it. Other device manufacturers followed suit. Pretty soon virtual assistants became commonplace features. And people got hooked. It was only after this secret was unlocked that people willingly went out and bought stand-alone devices like the Amazon Echo Dot and Google Home.

Make no mistake – the same thing is happening with applications for the enterprise. Modern platforms add a level of configurability and extensibility that adds agility needed to keep pace with the unprecedented pace of change in technology and business. Cloud and SaaS add speed and contribute to affordability. Pretty soon all sorts of artificial intelligence technologies will be generally available for the enterprise, but you won’t be able to take advantage of them if you are still stuck on old legacy solutions.

Automation

Robotic Process Automation (RPA), as the name implies, is all about automating routine tasks in order to free up time available to perform tasks which require more strategic thought and therefore contribute more value to your business. For decades ERP has claimed to streamline and automate these processes, but the term “automate” was used quite loosely, to say the least. Today’s technologies truly enable these tasks to be performed with little or no manual effort. Automating the filing of travel expenses, reconciling data for a month or year-end close, three-way matching and applying cash to outstanding invoices are all examples of routine tasks that can be largely automated, requiring manual intervention only when exceptions are detected.

And of course, the more intelligence you can add to these automated processes, the fewer the number of exceptions that require manual intervention. Embedding artificial intelligence and machine learning enables RPA to better detect anomalies and prevent errors. With these added capabilities, the more they are used and the more data that is collected, the more they continue to learn, adding more intelligence over time. Today’s “intelligent ERP” solutions are nothing like legacy applications of yesteryear.

Advanced Analytics

The addition of advanced analytics, often in the form of predictive or cognitive analytics, is another way to make ERP smarter. Early ERP solutions were notorious for being far easier to get data into than information out of. You had to know exactly where to look and how to get there if you had any hope at all of getting answers to business questions. And you had to ask all the questions because the solutions didn’t offer up much to notify you of issues.

That has all changed with new next generation solutions. Today decision makers are often greeted with role-based, personalized dashboards with data presented in charts, graphs and other visually appealing and meaningful ways. These dashboards become their portal, a gateway so to speak, to all the data previously hidden in applications. They get alerts and notifications on those dashboards and on their mobile devices. Not only have user interfaces become more intuitive, making systems easier to use, some have even learned to “listen” and “speak.”

All next generation solutions today do a better job of presenting data to you. But data driven decision-making requires more than just reporting. Predefined reports help you answer relatively static questions like: How much did I sell by customer type or region? Analytics present the bigger picture and can help you figure out what questions to ask like: Where and how will I have the most success in regaining and /or growing revenue? In your quest to answer that you might ask: Are all sales down, or only by region or customer type or sales rep or product? This might take several iterations and the exact path you will take in your questioning won’t be apparent until you start to drill down.

Smarter analytics (like predictive and cognitive analytics) can spot patterns that produce fewer sales. Smarter analytics can do predictive scoring and modeling to identify those patterns early and exploit them for guided decision- making. The smartest solutions will then continue to learn, getting better at spotting issues earlier, hopefully in time for you to course correct.

Tips For Your Evaluation

Looking for a new ERP solution is not something you do every day. If it has been awhile since you have been through this exercise, take note: A lot has changed.

Whereas fit and functionality once drove most decisions, basic and even not so basic features and functions are table stakes today. While an 80% fit used to be acceptable, today’s flexible and technology-enabled solutions should get you much closer to 100% than ever before, without the need for invasive customization.  Of course, you still need to perform due diligence and confirm robust functionality, including industry-specific features and functions, but if you haven’t looked around for awhile, expect to be pleasantly surprised.

Yet while features and functions are indeed important, there is danger in making a decision solely based on what you need today, because it might not be what or all that you need in the future. Last year my Enterprise Solution Study found 90% of companies believe they face some level of risk in their businesses and/or industries being disrupted by new innovative products, new ways of selling or pricing existing products or services, entirely new business models, or some combination of all of the above. And don’t forget all the traditional forms of disruption like expansion, reorganizations and regulatory issues. All this disruption can have a cascading impact on business application requirements, making agility – the ability to easily innovate, evolve and change – even more important than current functionality. For that you need the right approach to innovation and the right architecture and platform to support it.

Also equally important today is the whole user experience, including easy navigation, visual appearance and personalization. And don’t forget integration capabilities and the quality of built in reporting and analytics. Any evaluation today requires you to raise the bar in terms of your search.

So…Where do you Start?

The answer to that question may be closer to home than you think. Just because you are not running a next generation ERP, enabled with the latest and greatest technology, doesn’t necessarily mean your current ERP solution provider hasn’t stepped out ahead of you.

SAP might be the perfect example of this. A longtime leader in the market, SAP is perhaps one of the very few, if not the only “household name” in ERP. However, many of its customers have yet to move to its latest, most technically advanced product, SAP S/4HANA. While SAP also has products that target the small to midsize market (SAP Business One and SAP Business ByDesign), it is also the incumbent in many very large multi-national enterprises that have invested heavily in predecessors to S/4HANA. And if these solutions date back far enough, chances are they have been heavily customized. Without the advantage of platforms and architectures available today, any kind of modification or invasive customizations created barriers to moving forward. And therefore, the move to S/4HANA is certainly no simple migration.

However, if you are currently running your business on an outdated solution, whether it is an older version of SAP’s ERP or a legacy solution from any vendor, simply migrating to a newer, more technology-enabled system means you will drag along decisions that were made when ERP was far less feature rich, technology enabled and flexible. You shouldn’t be looking to recreate what you are doing today, but instead automating, improving efficiency and productivity, providing added visibility and giving yourself the ability to make more data-driven, strategic decisions. You should also look for a return on your investment (ROI) in terms are real cost savings and/or the generation of increased revenue. For this, you need to treat it like a re-implementation, with all the careful planning and commitment that implies.

Not sure where to look for this kind of ROI? I would strongly encourage you to examine these real-world SAP Success Stories.

Conclusion and Recommendations

If you are currently running an ERP solution that you cannot legitimately call modern, intelligent or next generation, you might still be viewing its replacement like brain surgery. I prefer to treat it more like joint replacement. You suffer with that bum knee or hip until you can’t stand the pain any longer, or you simply can’t function properly. Many ERP implementations today suffer from pain, and prevent you from being flexible and able to do what they need to do.

Whether you view ERP as brain surgery or joint replacement, there is no such thing as non-invasive surgery. It can and should have a serious impact on your business, but hopefully in a positive way.

Here are a few recommendations for a successful ERP journey:

  • Don’t wait until the patient is critical. Making a selection and running an implementation project when the business is under duress does not create an atmosphere of careful consideration, planning and execution. You will be tempted to take shortcuts that you may later regret.
  • Need it but can’t afford it? Consider the potential cost savings. Most ERP solutions pay for themselves in less than two years. If capital funds are not available to support the project, consider SaaS deployment with less up-front cost.
  • Set goals and measure. Before embarking on your ERP project, decide which metrics will measure success. Establish a base line, set goals and measure progress against those goals. When you reach them, set another goal. Continue to measure and continue to reap more benefits.

An ERP implementation is not easy. Just like surgery, there will be some “recovery” time. But that doesn’t mean your business stops during that recovery period. It just means you need to take extra care to insure a full recovery, with the result being a healthy business that is able to function better than ever.

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