HCM

Oracle Delivers New Release of Next-Generation Cloud Applications

 

Today Oracle announced major innovations across its Oracle Cloud Applications, further extending what is already a suite of cloud applications that is both broad and deep. Release 13 includes hundreds of new features, several new products that are extensions to the current solution, and improvements to the user experience.

If Oracle customers are like the survey respondents to our 2017 Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study, Oracle is hitting on all cylinders in terms of what users want.

What Users Want

In our latest study we asked survey respondents to prioritize five different approaches to innovation on a scale of 1 to 5, where 5 was the highest priority. This was a stack ranking, so they were not allowed to give any two the same ranking.

Table 1: How do you want your application vendor to prioritize?

Source: Mint Jutras 2017 Enterprise Solution Study

Table 1 is sorted by the first column, which includes all respondents. While not every respondent selected “enhance existing functions” as their top priority, it clearly came out on top. Improving the user experience and extending the solution were number 2 and 3 respectively. Release 13 hits on all 3.

Note: We did have 54 Oracle customers represented in our total pool of about 600 participants, but given the size of the Oracle customer base, we don’t consider that sample size sufficient to be truly representative.

Given this is an announcement of Oracle’s Cloud portfolio, we also have to consider whether priorities are any different when looking at SaaS deployments, hence the additional 3 columns in Table 1. The short answer is no. While there are some slight variations in the relative priority, enhancing existing functions remained at the top regardless of deployment. Those running hybrid deployments (where parts are on-premise and parts are in the cloud) are a bit different, but it is a little harder to draw conclusions from this because of the high degree of variability across hybrid deployments.

We presume that many of these hybrid deployments resulted from a cloud strategy that leaves existing systems in place but surrounds them with cloud/SaaS solutions. This was in fact the top cloud strategy for two years running in our 2016 and 2015 studies, although not by a wide margin (Figure 1).

Figure 1: What best describes your cloud strategy?

Source: Mint Jutras 20176 and 2015 Enterprise Solution Studies

While we didn’t ask this question in 2017, we will continue to watch plans and preferences moving into the future as we observe a lot of movement away from legacy on-premise solutions (finally!)

Some Highlights

So what are some highlights of Release 13? Here are some provided by Oracle:

Oracle SCM Cloud

Oracle SCM Cloud Release 13 extends the SCM suite with the introduction of more than 200 major features and six new products that cover Sales and Operation Planning, Demand Management, Supply Planning, Collaboration, Quality Management and Maintenance. The new innovations are introduced “to help organizations transform their operating models to meet rapidly changing business demands by evolving from traditional supply chain systems to connected, comprehensive, agile, and customer-oriented supply chain management capabilities.”

Oracle CX Cloud Suite

Oracle CX Cloud Suite Release 13 introduces new innovations to Oracle Sales Cloud, which include enhanced mobile and data visualization capabilities, as well as a range of new capabilities that increase sales rep productivity. In addition, Oracle has extended Oracle CX Cloud Suite with the introduction of Oracle Engagement Cloud. The new solution combines sales and service capabilities to enable organizations to increase customer satisfaction, loyalty, and up-sell opportunities.

Oracle ERP Cloud

Oracle ERP Cloud Release 13 builds upon the solution with extended depth and breadth across FinancialsProcurement, and Project Portfolio Management (PPM) and adds deeper domain functionality including Dynamic Discounting and Multi-Funding. In addition, industry coverage for higher education, financial services, and manufacturing, as well as expanded country localizations for India and Brazil are included.

Oracle HCM Cloud

Eighty percent (80%) of enhancements to Oracle HCM Cloud Release 13 were customer driven, extending Oracle’s commitment to customer success. Release 13 enhances Oracle’s complete, end-to-end solution for all HCM processes and introduces expanded user experience personalization and branding, making it easy for everyone to connect on any device. It also includes improved capabilities to support the needs of customers with unionized workforces, such as retail and healthcare, with flexible work models.

Summary

All told, it looks like Oracle’s interest in being the biggest and best cloud solution provider for enterprise applications has not waned. First the acquisition of NetSuite and now what seems to be a very major release as a result of its own development efforts. Combined these efforts indicate Oracle is moving ahead full throttle.

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Enterprise Odd Couple: Plex Systems Partners with Workday

Pre-Packaging 2-Tier ERP for Manufacturers

Last week at its annual PowerPlex user conference, Plex Systems announced Plex Connect, along with several new partnerships and packaged connections. The goal of this new open integration framework is to “make it easier for manufacturers to connect people, things and applications to the Plex Manufacturing Cloud.” One of these partnerships stands out as being somewhat unique in that it is forged with another Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solution provider… Workday.

At first glance these two might seem like the proverbial odd couple. As another ERP vendor, Workday would appear to be a competitor. But it is not, because Workday is not a solution that is focused on the needs of manufacturers. And companies that “make things” are the only targets for Plex Systems. So if Workday isn’t for manufacturers, why would any Plex customer be interested in connecting to it? Because typically corporate headquarters doesn’t make anything, but might have sophisticated accounting requirements to support global operations. This partnership is all about delivering a pre-packaged 2-tier ERP.

Making the Case for 2-Tier ERP

Operating across a distributed environment has become a way of life for a large percentage of manufacturers today, even smaller ones. In fact 77% of all manufacturers that participated in the 2015 Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study had more than one operating location served by ERP (Figure 1). And 67% operate as a multi-national company. Even those with annual revenues under $25 million average just over 2 operating locations and that average grows steadily as revenues grow. This means very few companies today are able to conduct business as a single monolithic corporation.

Each operating division will have operational needs and must then feed to corporate financials for consolidation and reporting.

Figure 1: Environments Are More Distributed and Remote

Plex WDAY Fig 1Source: Mint Jutras 2015 Enterprise Solution Study

Note In Figure 1 company size is determined by annual revenue.

  • Small: annual revenues under $25 million
  • Lower-Mid: $25 million to $250 million
  • Upper-Mid: $250 million to $1 billion
  • Large: revenues over $1 billion

In years gone by all the different operating locations depicted in Figure 1 were likely to be left on their own to evaluate, select and implement a solution to run their operations. However, that scenario is quite rare today. The vast majority (90%) has established corporate standards for enterprise applications (Figure 2).

Figure 2: Have you established corporate standards for enterprise solutions?

Plex WDAY Fig 2Source: Mint Jutras 2015 Enterprise Solution Study

But this doesn’t necessarily mean a single solution runs the whole enterprise. Very often the ERP solution installed at corporate was selected for its ability to report and consolidate across multiple divisions. Very often these corporate accounting solutions (like Workday) don’t have the necessary functionality to run the operations of its divisions, especially if those divisions are manufacturing sites. In these cases, the standard solution for these manufacturing operations is a different solution – one like the Plex Manufacturing Cloud. Hence…

The Emergence of 2-tier ERP

In fact this 2-tier standard has become quite commonplace. Of those that have established corporate standards, less than half (47%) uses a single standard where all units, including corporate headquarters, use the same solution (Figure 3). At the same time, 31% have established a 2-tier standard and another 22% have a multi-tier standard. This latter category is most typical in a diversified corporation where you might see different types of businesses at the divisional level – you might have distribution warehouses or sales and service locations in addition to manufacturing sites.

Figure 3: Is this a single, two or multi-tier standard?

Plex WDAY Fig 3Source: Mint Jutras 2015 Enterprise Solution Study

It is this middle 31% that is targeted by the Plex Systems/Workday alliance, although it might work equally well in the multi-tier scenario. In fact if the non-manufacturing sites are sales and service operations, Workday itself might be the chosen standard for those divisions, eliminating the need for more than two different ERP solutions.

Plex Systems acknowledges that its solution is not the best for non-manufacturers. In fact Plex makes that point in its bold move to implement Workday for its own operations. The initial knee-jerk reaction might be, “What? They don’t sip their own champagne?” (An analogy I much prefer to eating one’s own dog food!) But while Plex knows and serves manufacturing very well, it isn’t a manufacturer. It makes software. While software companies that deliver on-premise solutions might burn CD’s, package them with documentation and ship a physical product to a customer, as a pure cloud provider, Plex sells software only as a service. The accounting for software, services and subscriptions is very different than accounting for shipping and delivering a physical product. But at the same time, this decision also underscores the fact that Plex is not afraid to make the right business decision in managing its own business.

But getting back to the 2-tier scenario, in the past we have seen solutions from SAP and Oracle dominate the corporate scene. Yet solutions like Workday, born in the cloud, are starting to chip away at the dominance of these two major players. And an alliance like this will only serve to accelerate this erosion. Very often a decision for SAP and Oracle might have been influenced by the efforts involved in integrating and rolling up financials from the distributed sites. While these have typically not been “out of the box” in the past, popular sentiment is that if you go with one of these “giants,” you will likely find systems integrators and other service partners who have done it before. That means they have a lot of experience with SAP and Oracle. You still pay for the connection, but you are at least dealing with a higher level of expertise.

With pre-packaged connectors, the need for this prior experience goes away and the expense of forging the connection drops dramatically.

Impact on Roadmap

So after hearing about this and other partnerships (with Salesforce and DemandCaster) the first question I posed to Plex was regarding the impact these might have on their own road maps. In terms of Workday, my specific concern was over enhancements planned to make its ERP more “global.”

Plex already has customers running the Plex Manufacturing Cloud from more than 20 countries, but it has let its customers essentially “pull” them into those countries and doesn’t necessarily support all the localizations and legislative regulations required in each… or all the complexities of growing multi-national companies. About a year ago Plex Enterprise Edition made its debut at PowerPlex 2014 along with an aggressive roadmap to support complex, global, multi-plant manufacturing organizations with multi-entity financial and supply chain management requirements.

In answer to my question, Plex has assured me none of these partnerships will result in taking planned innovation off the table. It will continue to invest in these globalization efforts. Similarly, other solutions such as DemandCaster will not prevent Plex from developing its own forecasting / demand and supply planning software. The alliance with Adaptive Insights will not prevent Plex from developing more robust financial planning and budgeting offerings. But I am thinking Plex doesn’t really need to compete against Salesforce for CRM.

 Conclusion

In the meantime and well into the future, Plex Connect should indeed make it easier for manufacturers to connect people, things and applications to the Plex Manufacturing Cloud. And in today’s connected, digital economy, isn’t that what it’s all about?

A Side Note: Is Workday ERP?

In the past I have posed the question about Workday: Is it ERP? Does it Matter? Many refer to Workday as ERP, but by my definition (an integrated suite of modules that provides the operational and transactional system of record of a business) an integrated finance and accounting solution that does not manage the “order” falls a bit short, But it does manage a contract, which for “talent intensive organizations” including software and Internet service companies like Plex) is equally, if not more important. Feel free to read my full analysis in the highlighted link above but for purposes of our discussion here in terms of 2-tier ERP, I am comfortable in referring to Workday as ERP.

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SAP S/4HANA at SapphireNow

Prior to SapphireNow 2015, I anticipated that SAP S/4HANA would dominate the event. Due to scheduling conflicts I arrived late, but from what I can tell, so did S/4HANA. Of course it did make its way onto the main stage later on in the opening keynote, but not with the fanfare expected for “the biggest product launch in the history of the company.”

Formally announced in February 2015, SAP S/4HANA is described by SAP as follows:

What is SAP S/4HANA?

SAP S/4HANA is a new product fully built on the most advanced in-memory platform – SAP HANA – and modern design principles with SAP Fiori User Experience (UX). SAP S/4HANA delivers massive simplifications (customer adoption, data model, user experience, decision making, business processes and models) and innovations (Internet of Things, Big Data, business networks, and mobile-first) to help businesses run simple in a digital and networked economy.

The SAP Business Suite is SAP S/4HANA’s predecessor. The Business Suite is just that: a suite of separate (integrated) products including ERP, CRM, SRM, SCM and PLM. Like the SAP Business Suite, SAP S/4HANA is designed for the large enterprise, but unlike the SAP Business Suite, all these separate products will be merged into a single product, SAP S/4HANA, eliminating any redundancy of data and the resultant synchronization or data passing. Both will play well with certain SAP cloud offerings including SuccessFactors (HCM) and the Ariba [supplier] network.

Also in February, Hasso Plattner announced that it would eventually satisfy the requirements of the same 26 industries SAP has spent decades building out, implying customers should be patient because this would indeed take time. After all, SAP had over 400 million lines of code to rewrite.

To get a better sense for the similarities and differences between the Business Suite and SAP S/4HANA, I would suggest you take a moment and read SAP S/4HANA: Simple, Fast, Different. That post concluded with “…the devil is in the details.” There were still many lingering questions over how both new customers and existing SAP customers would make the transition. Many industry observers were clamoring for more details on plans, roadmaps and specific status of different functions for different deployment options.

Some of those observers are still clamoring, some quite loudly. And as you might expect, they aren’t shouting SAP’s praises from the rooftops. They are looking for detailed roadmaps. But roadmaps for what? And where are they looking? I know SAP is preaching “Simple.” It is a commendable goal to try to simplify the implementation for any one customer. But where these customers are now is anything but simple.

Taken en mass, the “typical” SAP customer just doesn’t exist. The sheer number of different products, versions, databases, hardware platforms and configurations is staggering. Customers (or pundits) are not going to find all the answers and a road map wrapped up in a nice bow on a website. Each customer (and prospect) needs to engage one-on-one with SAP. And quite frankly, which customers raise their hands and express interest can and should impact the sequence in which SAP will deliver pieces of the puzzle.

If SAP publishes a timetable and sticks with it, come hell or high water, it runs the risk of not satisfying real demand. On the other hand if SAP publishes said timetable and then adjusts it according to actual demand, the industry observers without any skin in the game will cry foul. SAP will be damned if they do, damned if they don’t. There is a lot of moving parts here folks, and the more fluid and responsive SAP can be, the better for its customers.

That is not to say that SAP can afford to take its time and wait. But it is not waiting. While Hasso may have implied it would take time to bring those 26 different industries over to S/4HANA, indeed they are all there today – kind of. There was some disbelief expressed in the Executive Q&A when Bernd Leukert (member of the Executive Board and the Global Managing Board of SAP with global responsibility for development and delivery of all products across SAP’s product portfolio) announced they were all there. No, the development team did not rewrite all that code in the last 3 months, but it did make sure that the code supporting these industries was compatible with SAP S/4HANA. This is just the first stage in the full transition (rewrite) of code, but a necessary one if customers want to start making the move to SAP S/4HANA today as it is still progressing.

Customers starting on the SAP S/4HANA journey today will be running a mix of code that has been converted (to HANA) to be compatible and code that has been optimized. Customers that have not started the journey might need some help in seeing the (vast) potential benefits for doing so. Typically this assistance comes from other customers that already had an idea. Seeing those customers on stage is one of the reasons customers come to an event like SapphireNow.

But SAP S/4HANA is really too new for that. Or is it? SAP did have customers on stage, but they were more likely to be customers who had gathered experience through SAP Business Suite on HANA. So the stories tended to be more about HANA than S/4HANA. And as Jon Reed pointed out, Surprisingly, the business potential of the HANA platform is rarely factored into the initial HANA use case.”

I actually don’t find that surprising at all. First of all, for the first several years SAP itself had been talking about HANA as break-through technology in search of a problem. In recent years it has tried to shift the discussion to the business value, but that transition is hard because many SAP-ers and most industry influencers talk in “tech-speak.” Even those that insist they are talking about the impact on the business often litter the rhetoric with phrases like nearline storage, dynamic tiering, multi-tenant database containers, expansion in virtualization, publishing of objects, etc. ..along with a whole host of alphabet soup (SOAP, REST, HTML5, XML, etc.)

News Flash: business folks don’t know or care about these tech terms.

Those business users do care about speed of reporting. They care about getting answers to questions and knowing which questions to ask. And they care about reduced database size when you equate that to the cost of storage. They do care about being able to inventory and assess prior customizations that built barriers to into taking advantage of innovation and growth opportunities. They care about flexibility and agility in terms of the business as their organizations grow and restructure.

The real questions should be:

  • Can SAP S/4HANA deliver all these business benefits?
  • Can SAP deliver innovation to SAP S/4HANA that will help prospects and customers respond to real-world business changes?

The HANA platform is critical to delivering on the promise of the first question. In order to satisfy the second question, SAP needs to start delivering innovation faster than it has ever done so in the past. And the bar continues to rise on this. Its competitors that deliver only a single multi-tenant SaaS solution have a leg up in that they only have to maintain a single line of code. Others that continue to offer both cloud and on-premise solutions are forced to maintain multiple versions and also often offer a choice of operating system and database. For every hour they spend innovating, they must spend a multiple of that hour making sure it works across the entire spectrum of choice offered, in any possible combination.

In offering multiple deployment options for SAP S/4HANA is SAP putting itself at the tactical disadvantage of having to maintain different lines of code? SAP says no. While SAP has committed to delivering annual updates to on-premise customers, it pledges to deliver innovation on a quarterly basis in the cloud. And yet it claims to only maintain a single line of code, and delivers different configurations, updates and extensions through more sophisticated packaging of all these elements. This implies the core code base never changes, but all innovation is managed separately and then packaged with the base. I myself am a little unclear on the technical details here, but the goal is spot on. Business users will have to trust SAP on this for the moment. Time will tell if this approach is indeed sustainable and manageable.

The future of SAP S/4HANA depends on it.

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Elysian Field Software will Broaden Epiphany’s Reach

Robust Field Service and HR/HCM Cloud Solutions

The launch of any new company is exciting, but even more so when it is launching from a foundation that is already stable, well-built and primed for growth. Epiphany, an early pioneer in Software as a Service (SaaS), founded in 2002, is a well-established NetSuite value added reseller that offers both NetSuite’s Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solution as well as its own comprehensive solutions for field service and human resource/human capital management (HR/HCM). At the December JRocket Marketing Winter 2014 Analyst Roadshow, Epiphany announced plans to launch a new company, Elysian Field Software.

This announcement represents far more than just a name change and rebranding effort. Epiphany will become a division of the newly formed enterprise, Elysian Field Software. While Epiphany will continue to serve the NetSuite community with an integrated suite approach, a brand new sister division, Elysian Field Services wil serve a broader market. Taking a “best-of-breed” approach it will offer comprehensive, affordable, cloud-based solutions to those running other ERP solutions, but suffering from gaps so often found in field service and HR/HCM functionality.

Epiphany: A Great Starting Point

Epiphany’s business will not change; it will continue to resell NetSuite’s ERP and serve the broader NetSuite community with tightly integrated, “best-of-breed” extensions. With 114 NetSuite deployments to date, Epiphany is one of the larger channel partners of NetSuite. The two companies have evolved over the years, as have their products. Looking at the NetSuite product through the eyes of their customers, Epiphany found some gaps in terms of field services and HCM. Using the NetSuite development platform Epiphany filled those gaps, and not just in a superficial way.

These extensions to NetSuite have grown into very comprehensive suites for field service and for human capital management that rival the most robust packages in comparable markets today. Typically these types of robust solutions are outside the budgets of small to medium size businesses, but Epiphany has been making these solutions affordable to even small customers since the early NetSuite days when most customers were just graduating from QuickBooks. Of course the average NetSuite customer has grown substantially over time, but Epiphany still serves the lower end of the spectrum (as well as larger companies) with products that could rival many of those sold into much larger enterprises.

About a year ago NetSuite acquired TribeHR, which brings a unique approach to the recruiting process and is integrated with NetSuite ERP in that it adds and provisions the employee upon hire. However, there is no natively built full HR/HCM solution. That’s what Epiphany brings to the table.

Human Resources/Human Capital Management Modules
These modules are currently sold as Epiphany products. While they will be re-branded under the Elysian Field Software label, they will also continue to be sold by Epiphany, along with NetSuite ERP.

  • Applicant Tracking: this is a comprehensive module that supports the entire process from Job description and requisitioning of positions, through screening and applicant processing, selection, employee record creation and on-boarding checklists.
  • Human Capital Management: supports “one click” hire process for setting up new employees, change management, separation, EEO data capture and organization charting.
  • Benefits: includes paid time off (PTO) management, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) tracking, health insurance management and COBRA event management.
  • PTO: “Leave” management includes overview calendaring for all staff with group/subsidiary/location selections, including customizable color-coding, supervisor views, graphical portlets and dashboards.
  • Performance Management: Goals determination and tracking can include cascading goals, supervisor/employee synergies, Lominger Competencies assignment and performance review rating calculation methodology.
  • Compensation Management: Salary ranges, job grade assignments, employee change tracking and compensation conformance.
  • Manager Self Service: includes employee data, PTO requests, review/update employee qualifications, job description/requirement definition, open applicant management, selection of applicants and property distribution management.
  • Employee Self Service: for qualifications, certifications, skills, licenses, leave and PTO requests, performance review participation and goal management.
  • Third-Party Integration: Integration to career sites, compensation planning, organizational modeling, payroll, resume parsing, etc.
  • Customized Report/Search Templates: Pre-screening, scoring, posting success rates, time to fill analysis, cost per hire analysis and more.

 

Customers can choose to use TribeHR along with Epiphany’s modules, or rely exclusively on Epiphany for HR/HCM functionality.

Business Expertise to Get the Job Done: Mantra Teams

However human resources and HCM projects, particularly in smaller companies, are challenged in a rather unique way, beyond the typical budgetary constraints. Seldom can small companies afford to hire a seasoned veteran with experience in implementing comprehensive HCM solutions, leaving the implementation in the hands of younger workers with little experience in driving an implementation to completion. And of course when staffed with younger workers, companies may experience a higher degree of turnover in the position. And even if a small company can afford and attract a seasoned veteran, this HR leader must wear many hats and is often consumed by overseeing compliance requirements and handling the occasional personnel crisis, causing the implementation to stall.

After spending 12 years deploying enterprise cloud solutions at other firms, Epiphany CEO Brenda Brinkley observed many incomplete or functionally deficient solutions, as well as inadequate resources to take full advantage of more robust solutions, even when available. To address this she came up with a concept of what she calls “Mantra Teams.” Rather than leaving the implementation to full-time employees, these teams will be available on demand, on a contract basis.

The Elysian Field Mantra Teams will be largely full time consultants and/or retired HR/HCM professionals who are experts in the field, but available for as long or short an engagement as required. These experts will be:

  • Screened and vetted by Elysian Field Software for their expertise and understanding of HR/HCM best practices
  • Trained on how to use the software
  • Affordable because they will be contracted directly by the customer with no middle man mark up
  • Motivated by the customer’s priorities but able to advise on how best to leverage the solution quickly and efficiently

In other words, this is a team of experts that customers can bring in simply to get the job done expeditiously.

Addressing the Complexities of Field Service

While HR/HCM modules are a big part of Epiphany’s business, remember it also provides a comprehensive suite of field services management modules as well. NetSuite’s early successes centered on professional services businesses, then moved into distribution and light manufacturing. It has been very successful in attracting manufacturers of consumer products, but has more recently targeted manufacturing of more industrial products. With this move, repair and maintenance of manufactured products becomes more complex. And again, Epiphany filled a functional gap with a robust, integrated suite of Field Service Management Modules.

Field Services Management Modules
These modules are currently sold as Epiphany products. While they will be re-branded under the Elysian Field Software label, they will also continue to be sold by Epiphany, along with NetSuite ERP.

  • Work Order Management: technician/equipment assignments, time/expense/part tracking, rapid billing and mobile management
  • Rentals Management: pricing rates, equipment repair, pick-up/return, route delivery management, time utilization of rental assets, financial utilization of rental assets, fleet age and apportionment, inventory management
  • Depot Repair: Parts/returns/repair, advanced replacement, warranty visibility, repair orders with equipment tracking and inventory availability
  • Job Costing: job profitability, work in progress, cost and profitability reporting
  • Contract & Warranty Management: auto-create and renew contracts, manage service contracts, co-terminate multiple contracts, revenue and profitability tracking, manufacturer and custom warranty tracking, convert warranty to contract, bill warranty overages
  • Scheduling & Dispatch: dispatch center, drag and drop technician scheduling, non-sequential work order scheduling, team scheduling, PTO, schedule by skill and availability
  • Technician Skill Management: skills, licenses, education & certifications, qualifications, tied to HR
  • Mobile Tech: offline and online, calendar view, daily & weekly expenses, signature capabilities, attachments, complete view of configuration, tasks, contracts, notes, photos, time, expenses, etc.

 

Field service solution implementations also have the potential of suffering from lack of fully functional solutions and also lack of attention. Not only has Epiphany made a robust solution to a complex problem quite affordable, but it also wants to address what might be a “commitment issue.” While a good field service department is likely to have deep and broad expertise, the very nature of the job means the customer is always the first priority. This makes a software implementation even more challenging. As a result, Elysian Field also intends to add Mantra Teams for Field Service deployments.

And these teams of seasoned experts will also pave the way for introducing more leading edge technologies into the field. Elysian Field intends to aggressively pursue “machine to machine” capabilities, supporting the concept of the “internet of things (IoT)” and new technologies such as 3D printing and mobile wearable devices. While these types of technologies might seem like “pie in the sky” overkill for some industries, they are particularly relevant for field service. Think what a portable 3D printer could do to supply repair parts in the field. Think about the value of providing diagnostics or schematics built right into safety glasses, leaving the technicians’ hands free to trouble shoot and repair. Think about the possibilities of remote diagnostics by tapping into machine data.

Beyond NetSuite

While all these existing products and new plans are potentially exciting for NetSuite customers, Elysian Field Software would like to bring these exciting capabilities to a broader audience – hence the new sister division to Epiphany. This could spell a huge opportunity for the newly formed umbrella company. While the HR/HCM modules could be a good fit for virtually any NetSuite customer, today the Field Service Management modules are a better fit for NetSuite’s target manufacturing customer, rather than its current installed base. Making these modules ERP-agnostic represents a huge opportunity for Elysian Field Software.

However, it also represents a technical and development investment. Currently Epiphany’s solutions are built with the NetSuite development platform. It is very likely that Elysian Field Software will need to re-architect these solutions on a different platform to best meet its goals. Will this be Salesforce’s Force.com platform? Will it remain on NetSuite’s? Will it use another, different platform? Right now, Elysian Field Services is evaluating all different possibilities and has not ruled any out.

But given the effort involved, is it worth it? Is there sufficient market, beyond the NetSuite base to merit such an investment? Mint Jutras believes it is, provided Elysian Field Services chooses wisely and brings the new product to market fairly rapidly. New technology and rapid application development tools will be key, as the market will not patiently wait. The vast majority of companies have a strong preference for an integrated end-to-end solution. However, for every company that has an overriding preference for a tightly integrated solution from a single company, two will not sacrifice functionality for ease of integration or dealing with a single vendor (Figure 1). The best of both worlds obviously will be robust functionality that is easily and seamless integrated.

Figure 1: Preferences for a Suite?

Elysian fig 1Source: Mint Jutras 2014 ERP Solution Study

Both field service and HR/HCM functions have historically been underserved in smaller companies. The Mint Jutras solution study found only a 42% adoption rate of any kind of after market service functionality installed in manufacturing companies, and where installed, it was twice as likely to be a separate application that was loosely integrated or not integrated at all (28%) versus embedded or tightly integrated (14%).

HR capabilities were more pervasive at 66%, but this adoption rate did not distinguish between a robust suite and marginal HR capabilities, but still those not well integrated by a wide margin.

2015: A Year of Transition

As talent management, both in house and in the field continues to grow in importance, if Elysian Field Services can fill those gaps, and also provide seamless integration, not just to NetSuite’s ERP, but to other players in the small to midsize market, it should be a winning combination. Watch for some important milestones in 2015, including an official launch of Elysian Field Software in the second quarter, followed by the choice of a new independent platform.

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Workday: Is it ERP or Not? Does it Matter?

You may have noticed I haven’t written much about Workday over the past few years. It’s not because I’m not interested. I am. But I haven’t had as much direct contact and interaction with the company as I would like in order to write from a basis of knowledge and experience. Having recently been invited to an analyst briefing call, I hope that is changing.

Some might assume this lack of direct contact is because I write a lot about ERP and Workday seems to go out of its way to characterize itself as not an ERP company. However, as an analyst, I always describe my coverage area as “enterprise applications with ERP at the core.” But the footprint of ERP has grown to the point where it is getting more and more difficult to determine where ERP ends and other applications begin. Those that know me well “hear” me talking about functions and topics (like performance management, talent and human capital management, etc,) that used to sit squarely outside of ERP, but today might sit either inside or outside that boundary. They also “hear” me talk about financial management, which can be an integral part of ERP, or a stand-alone solution. Both of these are certainly in Workday’s wheelhouse.

While Workday might be careful to say “We’re not ERP,” I hear other influencers refer to the company and its products as “ERP” all the time. In response I have been known to challenge those influencers, asking, “Is it really ERP?” I don’t do that to be contentious, or to denigrate Workday’s solution, but to better position it. Who should buy it and why?

I have always been careful to define ERP quite clearly, and in fact my definition outlasted me at Aberdeen. I left Aberdeen and founded Mint Jutras almost four years ago (January 2011), but my definition of ERP lives on there.

My definition of ERP is quite simple:

ERP is an integrated suite of modules that provides the operational and transactional system of record of the business.

Of course many (if not most) ERP solutions today do much more. But the minimum requirement is to provide an auditable record of operations, including any transaction that impacts the balance sheet (assets and liabilities) or the profit and loss statement. So does this mean an integrated suite of accounting modules qualifies as an ERP solution? It’s close, which is why I am able to collect so much data on financial management solutions in the context of my annual ERP solution studies, and in 2015 I am devising a way to capture data specific to each while distinguishing between the two. But the question is not as simple as it might seem and I have found the real answer lies in whether or not the solution handles orders: both purchase orders and sales orders. While purchasing is not strictly the domain of finance, it is not unusual for a financial management solution to include at least the basic requirements for purchasing transactions. It is less likely for these financial solutions to include the sales order.

An interesting aside: I attended the very first analyst call back in 2006 when Dave Duffield and Aneel Bhusri introduced Workday. I remember clearly that Workday was introduced as a ‘new ERP company”, although the first functions that would be developed would be for managing Human Resources (HR). The HR part came as no surprise given the founders’ background (Peoplesoft). But the reason I remember it so well is because Dave Duffield actually said something along the lines of, “You are probably wondering whether the world needs another new ERP system.” Of course Workday went on to fully develop its Human Capital Management solution, including HR, benefits, talent management, recruiting, payroll, time tracking and workforce planning and analytics. Financial Management came later.

So, what about the full operational and transactional system of record? Yes, Workday’s Financial Management solution handles the purchasing side, covering the full procure-to-pay process. And earlier this week, I got excited when I heard it also handles the full cycle from contract to cash. Aha! Is that the final piece of the puzzle that would qualify it as an ERP? While I might prefer a simple black and white, yes or no answer, I think there are at least a few shades of gray here, depending largely on the type of operations in question.

So I went in search of the sales order. I found a “contract” but not a sales order. But then remember that Workday specifically targets talent intensive organizations, including several for which it has developed new features in its latest Workday 23 release (the topic of the recent call):

  • Software and Internet Services
  • Financial Services
  • Business Services
  • Higher Education and Non-profits

Also noted on its website are healthcare, state and local governments, and retail and hospitality. These types of businesses don’t necessarily book an order in the classic sense of the term (e.g. when you think about an order for widgets). Colleges and universities don’t sell degrees. Hospitals don’t sell surgical procedures. Hotels don’t sell and deliver rooms. Business services are contracted for. Even software companies that might talk about booking an order are really more likely to sign a license agreement or offer a subscription (both are contracts). So in this case, the contract represents the commitment to buy and is the trigger for invoicing. In these cases, I would guess that Workday’s Financial Management suite can provide the full operational system of record for the business. In other words, by my definition, they are providing ERP to these types of businesses.

But if they were to stray outside these target markets, they can’t provide the full operational system of record, especially for a manufacturer. While Workday does target manufacturers, if you look closely you realize it is selling Human Capital Management to manufacturers, especially those looking to balance human resources to optimize revenue opportunities.

Flextronics, a global leader in design, manufacturing, distribution and aftermarket services, and one of the largest contract manufacturers in the world, is a Workday customer with over 200,000 employees in 30 countries. According to Mike McNamara, CEO, “We have to rebalance our workforce on a continuous basis for our customers. For example, we may be spending a lot more time in Malaysia and a lot less time in China. We may want to move more of our workforce into Mexico as opposed to Eastern Europe, depending on the markets we’re accessing. And Workday actually gives us the data to continuously analyze what our cost structures are—the average labor rates in each area. It has actually changed some of our investment policies for different countries as a result of studying the data and the trends in the data.”

Flextronics is running Workday’s HCM. I suspect Workday doesn’t sell a lot of Financial Management to manufacturers except maybe to replace corporate level financials. Manufacturing sites already have accounting functions embedded within ERP because it is hard for them to live without it. This is the perfect setup for a two-tier standard for ERP: manufacturing ERP at the divisions, rolling into a corporate ERP, which may just be financials, analytics and maybe even HCM (like Workday).

So this begs the question: Why does Workday go out of its way to characterize itself as not being ERP? Mark Nitter is the vice president at Workday responsible for setting the strategic direction of its products. He wrote about this in his blog post Why ERP Is Out, and Unified Finance and HR Is In, in which he assumes all ERP solutions were “designed for enterprises engaged in the manufacture and distribution of goods” and that “people were primarily seen as labor—a commodity whose cost is to be minimized.” He also assumes there is an arm’s length relationship between finance and HR. Mr. Nitter writes:

At Workday, we certainly don’t consider what we offer as “ERP.” From the beginning, our mission was to deliver an enterprise cloud for HR and finance, and this solution has been a key driver for many of our talent-driven enterprise customers, including AAA NCNU, Allied Global Holdings, Life Time Fitness, Sallie Mae, and TripAdvisor. For these companies and others, a business management system that unifies HCM and financials provides efficiencies and insights far beyond the capabilities of the ERP model.

An example: Imagine that a P&L analysis points to a revenue shortfall for your fiscal quarter. State-of-the-art financial drill-down analysis may help you identify which organization, product, or customer is responsible. But what if the reason for the shortfall cannot be determined through analysis of financial data? What if the reason for lower-than-expected revenue is that you have three open positions in the sales organization, and have had for six months?

The arms-length relationship between finance and HR that exists in ERP systems cannot deliver this insight. Separately, the finance department could identify where the shortfall occurred, and the HR department—if it knew where to look—could identify the hiring problem, but only a unified solution is capable of connecting the dots.

I would agree that most ERP solutions today couldn’t identify this hiring problem. But that is not because of any inherent limitations of ERP. It is because the ERP solution doesn’t have the same depth of functionality in HR that Workday has built into its solution. Yes, ERP evolved from MRP, which was originally designed to meet the planning needs of manufacturers. But ERP has evolved way beyond the realm of manufacturing and some ERP solutions on the market today – in fact those solutions that compete most directly with Workday – were never designed to support (physical) product-based businesses.

So, is Workday ERP? I would mostly agree with Workday and say, “Not really.” But does it matter what you call it? I would say, “Yes it does.” That is if Workday wants to be considered as a viable option in all the places where it could truly add value.

This is particularly true in companies that already have ERP and are not looking to replace it. Because HR has been largely underserved by ERP for many years, many ERP implementations lack a lot of specialized HCM functionality. Workday’s HCM can add very significant value, even without being sold as a “unified finance and HR solution.” If Workday portrayed itself as an ERP solution, that prospect would likely say, “No thank you. We already have one of those.”

Mint Jutras data indicates a dichotomy of preferences in satisfying HCM requirements. While there are some that have a strong preference for HCM functionality embedded within ERP, an (almost) equal number strongly prefer a separate (possibly stand-alone) applications. The remainder has no defined preference and will decide based on a combination of functionality and price (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Preferences for HCM Functionality

Figure 1 WorkdaySource: Mint Jutras 2014 ERP Solution Study

However, where the Workday solution might provide a complete system of record, this argument might work against Workday. Where those companies perceive the need for ERP, even though Workday might have all they need, if Workday says it doesn’t sell ERP, it might not be considered. This may also be true where companies might define a two-tier ERP strategy, with one ERP providing corporate financials and a second standard defined for units, divisions or business units. If the prospect has defined this as a “two-tier standard” for ERP, it will be looking for ERP at the corporate level, even though orders are managed at the divisional level and “unified finance and HR” is what it really needs. The difference in the label might make all the difference in which solutions they will consider.

Bottom line: I admire Workday for identifying the value of a unified finance and HR solution particularly for the “talent-driven enterprise” and for not portraying itself as something that it is not. Some of the influencers who refer to them as “ERP, just not for manufacturing” could learn a lesson or two from this. But at the same time, I would caution Workday against assuming that an ERP can’t and won’t unify finance, HR and a lot more.

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Thoughts From NetSuite’s SuiteWorld: What’s wrong with calling it ERP and CRM?

There seemed to be lots of talk and a bit of controversy floating around NetSuite’s SuiteWorld conference this week about the future of ERP (enterprise resource planning), CRM (customer relationship management) and other TLAs (three letter acronyms). NetSuite itself is a provider of ERP, CRM and ecommerce. Yet CEO Zach Nelson opened this door by attacking other vendors that don’t have solutions with footprints quite as broad as NetSuite. Zach said Salesforce wasn’t CRM because it didn’t capture the customer order. WorkDay’s HCM and accounting applications aren’t ERP. Zach has been known to go on the attack before, so this wasn’t out of character, and to a certain extent I agree with him. Sales force automation (which is Salesforce.com’s claim to fame) is often referred to as CRM even though I would argue it is only a subset. And Workday’s solution doesn’t fit my definition of ERP. (To be fair, I also haven’t heard Workday call its solution ERP.)

However, some “influencers” in attendance also picked up on this theme. One went so far as to suggest ERP and CRM should go away as software categories. Another stated that “cloud ERP” is redefining what we mean by ERP.

I disagree on both counts.

Companies in search of solutions to run their businesses need a frame of reference, a starting point to define what it is they need. They can’t start with a search for vendors offering “something to run my business.” As loosely as ERP and CRM are often defined, they do accomplish that. And I also don’t believe ERP needs to be redefined, at least not the way I define it.

Too often industry analysts and other influencers over-complicate definitions, perhaps in an attempt to prove just how much the average businessperson needs them, or perhaps to prove how smart they are. I prefer to keep it simple. I define ERP as follows:

ERP is an integrated suite of modules that provides the operational and transactional system of record of the business.

Of course, today most ERP solutions do more than this, and I have been saying for years now that it is getting more and more difficult to tell where ERP ends and other applications begin. But this definition is timeless. It also implies ERP cannot be static. The way companies operate is changing and therefore ERP must also evolve to reflect new ways of transacting business. NetSuite has been responding to this challenge over the past few years, through its approach to omnichannel commerce and with several announcements this week including:

  • A brand new, modernized, mobilized user experience (first available on Apple IOS, to be followed by Android)
  • The unveiling of a “next-generation services resource planning (SRP)”, a unified cloud solution to meet the combined needs of project- and product-based businesses. The solution can be configured as a stand-alone SRP solution or combined with NetSuite’s ERP. It targets software, IT services, consulting, advertising and marketing services companies.
  • A new SuiteGL, intended to “transform the general ledger from one size fits all into a custom business asset.” New capabilities are being developed to add

o   New custom segments to the chart of accounts (example: to support fund accounting and advanced managerial reports)

o   Custom lines (example: you might post additional journal entries based on the country in which the transaction originates)

o   Custom transaction types (example: vendor billing accrual, employee expense report accrual, payroll journal, depreciation journal, statistical account entries)

  • Mobilization of its newly acquired HCM solution: NetSuite TribeHR Mobile for iOS brings collaboration tools, enterprise search capability, time off management and employee recognition (kudos) to Apple iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch mobile devices.
  • A new B2B Customer Center built on NetSuite’s SuiteCommerce platform providing

o   A self-service customer portal

o   Customization, billing and payments, account and product management capabilities, including lists for seasonal purchasing

o   Responsive web design capabilities that can optimize sites for multiple devices

So NetSuite is in tune with the desire and need for business transformation, largely based on the new requirements of this digital age. But… back to the issue at hand.

What impact does the cloud have on this perceived need to redefine what we mean by ERP? Cloud does have an impact, but it is not so much changing what we mean by ERP as changing what we should expect from ERP, a subtle difference, but a very meaningful one. We still need to track inventory assets, record orders, deliver, invoice and collect payment. In a B2B environment, these end-to-end business processes (like order-to-cash and procure-to-pay) have traditionally spanned weeks or months. The cloud connects us and it might help us automate processes, compressing them to days, hours or even minutes. But we still need to keep that system of record. We still need ERP. We just need a better ERP.

I spent a lot of time evangelizing these new and better ERP solutions in 2013. I called them “next generation” ERP: providing better ways to engage with ERP, replacing invasive customization with configuration that is preserved from release to release, more innovation and better integration. Much of what NetSuite has done, and is still doing, is driven by the need for a modernized, technology-enabled ERP.

But what about CRM? Zach declared Salesforce wasn’t CRM because it didn’t manage the customer order. I will leave a formal definition of CRM to those that specialize in that category, but I would argue that the customer order doesn’t belong in CRM anyway. It belongs in ERP because it is a fundamental element of the system of record of the business. But does it really matter? Not when we’re talking about NetSuite’s solution, because ERP, CRM (and eCommerce) are all built as one system. And because it is all one system, everything works seamlessly together and there’s no redundancy of data. The end user doesn’t really know or care if it is a function of CRM or ERP, unless of course they only subscribe to one or the other and not both.

So yes, NetSuite certainly has a leg up on Salesforce in providing what CRM vendors traditionally promise: a 360o view of the customers. NetSuite can and Salesforce (or any CRM-only vendor) can’t. And that is because it is delivered all in one set of code: a fully integrated suite. If sales or support representatives need to see all outstanding quotes, shipped orders, open or paid invoices, they just go to NetSuite. They don’t need to worry about whether it is part of CRM or ERP.

Some analysts have started to call this “a platform.” While I would define “platform” differently, my definition really doesn’t matter. Whether you call it a platform, an integrated suite, or just extended ERP, I suppose it does strengthen the argument for making ERP and CRM go away. You don’t need ERP and CRM. You need this integrated platform. But now we’re just getting into semantics and we’re not really adding value to the conversation. For a prospect or customer buying ERP today, the real question is what are the boundaries of the solutions being considered and how much of the needed functionality does it provide?

The footprint of ERP has grown steadily over the past three decades. We’ve reached a point where the boundary of where ERP ends and other applications begin has become quite blurry. Those in search of solutions should strive to clearly understand these boundaries, which will vary from solution to solution. CRM is only one such complementary application now offered by ERP vendors. But not all CRM solutions offered by ERP vendors are developed and delivered like NetSuite’s solution. A NetSuite customer can subscribe to either of these as a stand-alone NetSuite application, but if you subscribe to both, they operate as a single tightly integrated solution. This is not the case with all solution providers. Just because you are buying both from a single vendor doesn’t guarantee the two (or more) applications have been designed and developed as a single integrated solution, particularly if the complementary solution has been acquired.

In the past an integrated module of ERP tended to provide lighter-weight functionality than that provided by separate, so-called “best-of-breed” applications. So there was a clear trade-off between specialized functionality, which came with the added cost and effort of integration. But the capabilities of those built-in ERP modules today often rival or even exceed the capabilities of stand-alone applications. And the connected cloud and other modern technologies have made integration easier. So the trade-off isn’t quite so clear.

We explored this a bit in our 2014 Mint Jutras ERP Solution Study, asking participants about preferences for a suite approach (like NetSuite’s ERP and CRM) or a more specialized solution (like NetSuite’s partnership with AutoDesk for PLM).

It is clear that while there is an overwhelming preference for an integrated solution, most will be cautious about sacrificing functional requirements for ease of integration or for the purposes of having either a single throat to choke or a single back to pat (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Preferences for a Full Suite

Netsuite fig 1Source: Mint Jutras 2014 ERP Solution Study

This of course puts added pressure on software vendors like NetSuite to continue to innovate and expand their solutions. The easiest way to deliver a seamlessly integrated, expanded solution is to develop it internally, rather than to go shopping for additional features and functions (through acquisition or partnership). Those solution providers that exclusively deliver through a multi-tenant SaaS model will have an advantage in this regard because they maintain a single line of code. NetSuite, for example, delivers two releases a year.

Those that offer only licensed, on-premise solutions, or the same solution through the cloud and on-premise don’t have that luxury. Minimally they will have to maintain multiple releases to accommodate those customers that can’t or won’t upgrade. And very often they offer the software on different operating systems and different databases. Any combination of these increases their support and maintenance efforts exponentially and leaves fewer resources to apply to pure innovation. These vendors are more likely to deliver releases every 12 to 18 months.

Of course acquiring functionality (like NetSuite did with TribeHR for HCM) and even partnering (like NetSuite did with Autodesk for PLM) are options as well, providing the integration is seamless enough. NetSuite has proven that it is capable of delivering on all these different fronts.

While vendors and industry observers argue over what to call these solutions, most good business decision-makers tune out to these discussions. Most are more interested in solving business problems than in redefining what we call the solution. The labels we have today: ERP, CRM, PLM, HCM… are all fine as long as we continue to ask and expect more from them. I, for one, am more interested in helping those business leaders better understand the almost limitless possibilities for business transformation, than in coming up with the next new label – or even worse, the next new TLA.

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NetSuite Jumps on the Cloud HCM Bandwagon with TribeHR

Last month NetSuite announced its intention to acquire TribeHR, a cloud-based provider of an integrated suite of human capital management (HCM) solutions. HCM solutions are pretty “hot” these days and cloud-based HCM is even hotter. Some make the mistake of thinking interest (and growth) in the HCM market is a very recent phenomenon.  SAP’s acquisition of SuccessFactors and Oracle’s acquisition of Taleo (both cloud-based, by the way) only served to fuel that assumption. After all, if the “big guys” are jumping in, it must be the next “big thing.” Right? Yes and no.

Obviously HCM is “big” right now, but that didn’t happen overnight. I have been following HCM solutions since 2006, some years more closely than others. I actually think this HCM market started heating up back in the 2005 – 2006 timeframe. But it wasn’t the big guys that were making it happen. Instead, a lot of smaller HCM specialists saw the opportunity and jumped in. Most grabbed a niche – talent management, recruiting, performance management (reviews), incentive compensation or just plain HRIS. Very few took the full suite approach and that left the market with lots of players, but very fragmented.

In the early stages of this market growth, human resource management was still an afterthought in the world of ERP. For many years, the perceived requirements were rudimentary at best and Human Resource Management modules often were just repositories for employee data. They didn’t really manage anything. So what changed?

I believe there are three different forces converging here.

  1. The work force has changed
  2. All these smaller players demonstrated there was a real demand
  3. ERP vendors are more aggressive about expanding their footprints

The Changing Workforce

The workforce has actually been changing quite dramatically (at the very least) for the past two decades.  The combination of automation and outsourcing to countries where labor is cheap has resulted in the blue-collar and hourly workforce shrinking enormously. When the work force was made up largely of these types of roles, nobody really worried about “employee engagement” or managing an inventory of skills. Employees were hired for a particular job that might or might not require special skills. Companies advertised job openings, even for salaried workers. Potential employees filled out applications on paper and resumes came through the mail. Benefits came in standard packages where one size fit all, whether they really fit or not. There was no “self-service.” Reviews were paper-based and recognition might (or might not) come with a length of service award announced at the company Christmas party.

We live in a very different work world today where the hourly worker has largely been replaced with the knowledge worker. When companies today say, “Our employees are our greatest asset” they really mean it. The way we recruit and hire is different. No place is the “social” aspect more prevalent than in managing human capital.

The Demand for Solutions is Real

The proliferation of smaller HCM vendors has proven there is a real demand for solutions to help manage this changing workforce. Until these vendors came on the market with solutions for everything from applicant tracking to hiring and onboarding to managing performance, benefits and incentive compensation, human resource professionals managed with paper and spreadsheets. Of course some, particularly in smaller companies, still do. But that only serves to increase the market potential and the cloud helps make these solutions much more affordable for smaller companies.

Even these smaller HCM niche vendors have tended to focus their efforts on larger companies, always measured by numbers of employees. As ERP vendors that serve small and medium size businesses bring these options to their existing customers, that could change very dramatically and market growth could accelerate even more quickly.

The Expanding Footprint of ERP

I have been saying for the past few years that the footprint of ERP has expanded to the point where it is getting more and more difficult to tell where ERP ends and other applications begin. This obviously is by the design of the ERP vendors. An ERP vendor can grow in several ways. Obviously it can grow by acquiring new customers (e.g. one ERP swallowing up another). It can grow by selling one new customer at a time. And it can grow by increasing its share of its customer’s wallet. This means cross-selling and up-selling existing customers. And an ERP vendor can either develop its own solutions to sell to existing customers, or it can acquire them. Most growing ERP vendors today will combine these growth strategies.

In this case, NetSuite has chosen the shorter route to market by acquiring a suite of HCM solutions. With such an acquisition I always caution customers and potential customers of the vendors to look closely at integration. Just because a vendor acquires a complementary solution doesn’t mean that solution is integrated and if not, there may be no additional value delivered than was available prior to the acquisition. In the case of NetSuite’s acquisition of TribeHR this is not a concern.

Earlier this year TribeHR joined NetSuite’s SuiteCloud Developer Network (SDN) and has already created TribeHR SuiteApp, integrating the two solutions. The integrated solution is already available on NetSuite’s Marketplace. Joint customers have the added advantage of a pre-configured and integrated solution. Start the recruiting process in TribeHR and when you make the hire, it also sets up and automatically provisions the employee in NetSuite’s ERP. Yes, there is some redundancy but the transfer is “touch-less” and the data is synchronized in real-time. So far, about 30 out of the 450 TribeHR customers are also NetSuite customers.

The Opportunity

So where is the opportunity for growth in merging the two companies? It seems the biggest opportunity will be in up-selling the NetSuite installed base. Those NetSuite customers already running NetSuite Payroll have the highest probability of also wanting to buy HCM, but there are only about 100 of them, all US based. TribeHR is already deployed in more than 50 countries, but NetSuite’s Payroll supports US businesses only. But there should also be added opportunity for those small to mid-size businesses that have not yet invested in an HCM suite or even any HCM solutions. For the large enterprise, NetSuite will continue to partner with Oracle with Oracle HCM at the corporate level. But TribeHR might also be a viable alternative for two-tier deployments in smaller subsidiaries or divisions.

It is much more likely an existing NetSuite customer will extend its ERP solution with HCM than it will for a TribeHR customer to purchase an ERP, unless of course a new purchase of ERP was in the cards already.  According to Mark Gally, previously Chief Revenue Officer at TribeHR and now HCM, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at NetSuite and ric Gerstein, Sr. Business Development Manager, HCM at NetSuite, TribeHR will continue to be sold as a stand-alone solution. The real question will be whether the NetSuite brand will help or hurt in that sale.

NetSuite Poised to Compete

The bottom line: this acquisition positions NetSuite to compete in the expanded ERP market, where prospects are looking for their ERP vendor to satisfy are larger percentage of their enterprise needs. Because managing human capital is becoming more critical to the continued success and to market differentiation, this category has become more important and will likely continue to gain in importance. Those ERP vendors that can’t fill this need will be at a competitive disadvantage.  Acquiring a suite of HCM solutions is the fastest time to market and with all the recent acquisitions, the candidates for acquisition are shrinking quite quickly. Fortunately for NetSuite, it made its move with what appears to be an excellent choice, while the market is hot.

 

 

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Oracle, NetSuite, And Deloitte Partner To Deliver Integrated HCM And ERP Cloud Services

Last week NetSuite, in conjunction with Oracle and Deloitte, announced a partnership to deliver integrated human capital management (HCM) and enterprise resource planning (ERP) cloud services for the mid-market. Each of the three companies will throw something into the pot: NetSuite brings ERP, Oracle contributes HCM and of course both will be delivered via the cloud as software as a service (SaaS).  Deloitte plans to work with the two companies to develop a practice with “highly skilled practitioners specializing in tools and implementation services to help customers adopt the soon to be integrated SaaS technologies faster and more seamlessly.” The “soon to be” qualifier implies a future deliverable, so Oracle and NetSuite will also have to work together on this integration.

The partnership between Oracle and NetSuite is not new, but until now was pretty much limited to the technology stack. However, as far back as June 26, 2001, Oracle announced its “small business suite”, which was in fact NetSuite. But applications from NetSuite and Oracle never came together in any kind of substantive way. After all, in some ways NetSuite’s solution competes against Oracle’s Business Suite, as well as the ERP solutions acquired along with JD Edwards.

But NetSuite never really built out HCM functionality, choosing instead to partner. In fact, it already has several HCM partners, but they tend to have different solutions for different parts of the world. One of the biggest challenges for HCM solutions has always been the different regulations around the world, both in terms of payroll and other compliance requirements. Laws in the United States are very different from those in Europe, and even from one country in Europe to the next – and on and on around the world. Most HCM solutions start out as country-specific and never make it into the big leagues to compete on an international basis. But Oracle’s HCM solution can.

There are also quite a few different sub-segments within HCM ranging from the traditional human resource information system (HRIS) to talent management (including recruiting) to benefits and compensation, etc. It is more common to find individual point solutions for each segment than to find a full, comprehensive suite covering all of them. Hence the market is quite fragmented. Oracle is one of the few solutions that has the breadth of functionality and also serves a global market. It not only acquired expertise early in the game from its acquisition of Peoplesoft, but also more recently acquired Taleo for talent management.

The Taleo product, which is also SaaS only (like NetSuite) fits right in. But because this is a “cloud only” solution, global HR will have to come from Oracle Fusion, not the Oracle Business Suite. Fusion is still a work in progress.

The nature of the relationship between NetSuite and Oracle could best be categorized as a “referral” agreement. Oracle doesn’t sell NetSuite products and NetSuite doesn’t sell Oracle products. However Oracle has a dedicated HCM team, which will engage with the NetSuite sales team to jointly sell into NetSuite customers. This makes sense because a NetSuite ERP customer is more likely to buy Oracle HCM. That’s not to say an existing Taleo customer might not be interested in NetSuite, but I am sure the Oracle sales team would prefer to sell them an Oracle ERP. An Oracle HR customer running Oracle Business Suite or JD Edwards is less likely to buy NetSuite. Even if they were willing to consider this, the Oracle sales team isn’t going to bring the NetSuite team in for a possible replacement.

While referral arrangements are quite easy to create, there is one inherent weakness. They are also easy to walk away from. As mentioned above, right now Oracle Fusion is a work in progress. When it is a complete ERP, will Oracle still be as interested in partnering with NetSuite? Probably. NetSuite has an installed based of over 14,000 customers, so it is quite a large field of opportunity.

But what about the role of Deloitte? According to Jim Moffatt, CEO of Deloitte Consulting LLP, “Mid-sized companies are looking for solutions that allow them to be nimble and respond quickly to market opportunities. This newly integrated solution will help these organizations deliver better service at a lower cost, ultimately giving them an edge in the war for talent and a true competitive edge.”

I agree that mid-size companies are primed and ready for low-cost solutions. HCM functions have historically been under-served by enterprise applications and therefore there is a great deal of pent-up demand, particularly in the mid-market. I’m just not sure mid-size companies are ready to pay the price of a consulting firm like Deloitte. I suspect many mid-size companies will prefer the “do it yourself” approach, whether they are capable or not. Those that recognize their own weaknesses might turn to consultants, but the mind-set of a mid-size company expects a consultant to get in quickly and out just as quickly. Consultants such as Deloitte tend to like long engagements. We’ll have to wait and see how many times they get invited to the party and how long they stay.

All told though, this seems like a smart move for NetSuite. Its footprint expands without a huge development effort. Processes and functions managed by HCM solutions are quite easily integrated into ERP since they are not too deeply embedded in transactional activity. That is, unless time and attendance transactions are collected through workforce management in HCM. Even in this case, the integration is quite clean and simple. The HCM solutions market has been heating up, and this means the NetSuite team, in conjunction with its Oracle counterpart can provide a more complete and competitive solution.

Oracle also benefits from that wide open market of NetSuite customers, which get a more complete, integrated solution. As to Deloitte… we’ll see.

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