IQMS Pinnacle

A Changing of the Guard at IQMS

A new president and CEO took the stage at IQMS Pinnacle this week as customers and long time employees bid a fond farewell to founders and leaders Randy and Nancy Flamm. IQMS has been one of the best kept secrets in the world of ERP for manufacturing, but new investors hope to break out of the stealth marketing mode of the past and really put the company on the path to increased market awareness and a new level of growth. New CEO Gary Nemmers, previously with HighJump, stepped into this new role about six months ago and has been assembling a team that will shift the strategic focus, but also leverage successes of the past.

Under Randy’s leadership the customer base has grown quite steadily to about 500 customers (not too shabby!) and those customers have been instrumental in developing manufacturing functionality that is both broad and deep. Indeed product development has been almost exclusively driven by Software Enhancement Requests (SERs) submitted by customers. While that approach was smart in the early stages of the company’s growth, building “real world” functionality that expressly meets the needs of its users, at some point it also has some drawbacks.

The breadth of functionality that IQMS can deliver is impressive, particularly for a relatively small ERP player. Scratch the surface of other solutions from vendors comparable in size and you get more surface. Scratch the surface of EnterpriseIQ (IQMS’ ERP) and you find remarkable depth. And you also have a very engaged user community. But having been driven by existing customers, the development process has not been entirely well organized. One customer noted, “It’s like a house that started out small and then additions were added on piecemeal. In the end you might have everything you need, but not necessarily where you need it. You might find the oven in the living room.”

Development of some of IQMS’ mobile apps provides us a good example. The development team has produced some pretty cool features like its Android Bulletin Board, described as “Twitter for your shop floor” or “Messenger-like instant communication to workers on the shop floor.” This includes the ability to attach the equivalent of sticky notes to business objects (e.g. orders, work centers, etc.). As the status of these business objects changes, an update is automatically sent. But while most of this development work is now transitioning to HTML5, making it compatible with a range of devices including Android, iOS and Windows devices, many of the existing apps run only on Android – not very useful if your company has standardized on iOS or Windows.

This example is symptomatic of a larger limitation inherent in being completely customer-driven. Customers will never push a vendor to do a major revamp of the underlying technology – particularly small to midsize manufacturers They already have too much to worry about without asking their software provider to fix something that isn’t broken. And yet today that underlying technology is critical in building and/or maintaining a competitive advantage in our digital economy.

Questions inserted (new this year) in our 2016 Enterprise Solution Study lead me to believe many companies over-estimate their “digital preparedness.” A two thirds majority (67%) of manufacturers feel they are close to or very well prepared for the digital economy, yet Table 1 tells us a very different story.

Table 1: To what extent is your operational and transactional system of record digital?

IQMS Table 1Source: 2016 Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study

*B2C Commerce is Not Applicable to 18% of our respondents

Generally over half still rely heavily on paper for their transactional system of record – more proof no solution provider can rely on existing customers to push for a major technological shift (e.g. to full web-enablement, support of HTML5, social, mobile and cloud capabilities).

For this kind of progress, as well as growth and expansion into new markets, you need a strategic plan and a well-defined product road map. That is exactly what new VP of Product Management, Rob Wiersma, is setting out to do. This shift in overall product and corporate strategy will take some time to put in place, but this is not Rob’s first rodeo. He is only in his second month on the job, so right now customers and prospects will need to wait and watch for this. But I would expect to see some major progress within months, not years.

Another area that bears watching is IQMS’ cloud strategy. The catch phrase at IQMS Pinnacle was “Cloud is the new choice.” The choices from IQMS today include a traditional on-premise license, a hosted model or cloud managed services. Notice there was no mention of Software as a Service (SaaS). And just to be clear, we know that while all SaaS is cloud, not all cloud is SaaS.

While the two terms are often used interchangeably (I admit to falling into that trap as well), they are not the same thing. So let’s distinguish between the two:

  • Cloud refers to access to computing, software and storage of data over a network (generally the Internet.) You may have purchased a license for the software and installed it on your own computers or those owned and managed by another company, but your access is through the Internet and therefore through the “cloud,” whether private or public.
  • SaaS is exactly what is implied by the acronym. Software is delivered only as a service. It is not delivered on a CD or other media to be loaded on your own (or another’s) computer. It is generally paid for on a subscription basis and does not reside on your computers at all.

Again – all SaaS is cloud, not all cloud is SaaS. While the IQMS customers I spoke with are not expressing a strong desire for SaaS (in fact some are still trying to understand the difference between client/server and SaaS and cloud), many are also faced with the challenge of aging servers that ultimately will need to be replaced… or not. Moving to a hosted model may eliminate the need for upgrading this hardware, but it also might not, depending on who and how it is hosted. Moving to SaaS eliminates this problem by eliminating the need to invest in hardware and its ongoing maintenance, among all the other potential benefits of SaaS. And I am now seeing a shift in preference away from hosting and to a real SaaS solution (Figure 1).

Figure 1: How do you prefer your “cloud”?

IQMS fig 1Source: 2016 Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study

So far IQMS “cloud” options provide reasonable choices to customers not demanding SaaS, but this could limit growth in the future. IQMS added about 100 new customers in 2015 and is expecting to increase that number to 140 in 2016. So it will be interesting to watch as IQMS continues to further define its overall strategy, including cloud and SaaS.

Mr. Nemmers has also made some other changes in his (so far) short tenure with the company. On the advice of his head of customer support (a 20 year veteran of IQMS) he deployed new call center software (Five9 Call Center), which went live about a month ago and is now operating 24X7 and providing faster response time and quicker resolution of customer issues. The software features skill-based browsing to connect the customer to the right support technician, and a nifty feature that facilitates an automatic call back (without losing your place in line) when high call volume precipitates a longer than usual wait time.

In order to emerge from its stealth marketing mode, IQMS also has a new CMO, Steve Biesczcat, on board now for almost a year. I think we will see some significant changes in the near future, since Mr. Nemmers has doubled the SEO and brand recognition budget from a year ago.

There have been some changes on the sales side as well with a new VP of Sales Operations (long time industry veteran Gary Gross) and the formation of a new Customer Success Team (think account management), leaded by Ken Kratz, providing a better front line link from the customer to IQMS. Also expect growth in EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) through value added resellers (VARs) using the same model that has been successful in covering the Asia Pacific area.

In summary, I think 2016 will prove to be a year of transition for IQMS. I think fewer and fewer industry observers and potential prospects will be saying, “IQMS? Who’s that?” I look forward to seeing an aggressive and progressive road map and certainly more splash on the marketing side. I expect to see growth in North America and internationally. And through this transition I would expect customers to remain engaged and productive.

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