performance management

ANAPLAN: The New Age of Connected Planning

A Connected, Living, Actionable Plan for Continuous Improvement

In a recent report, Mint Jutras posed the question Is Planning & Performance Management A Marriage Made In Heaven? We concluded the key to marital bliss: more data, more tools, more often. Anaplan is one company that is committed to this approach. Back in December 2015 we applauded its solution as A Complete, Connected and Living Plan. But Anaplan hasn’t been resting on its laurels since then. The theme of its most recent customer event (Anaplan Hub 2017): A New Age of Connected Planning. Yes, Anaplanners are able to connect planning and performance management, but “the connected plan” means much more. Connected planning connects data, people and plans. And we’re not just talking about financial plans. We’re talking about being connected across the enterprise.

“Connected Planning”

Ideally, the enterprise should have a single, cohesive plan to maximize growth and profits. This should be both a financial plan and an operational plan. Of course there are different components of that plan, but you need all the different functions within an organization pulling in the same direction. This requires each function to narrow its focus and figure out exactly what it needs to do, without losing sight of the end goal. That is often easier said than done because traditionally this requires specialized tools and applications for each function, resulting in separate sales, finance, workforce and supply chain plans. How do you bring them altogether? Too often the answer is, you don’t.

After all, what software company provides financial planning, budgeting and forecasting, sales and operations planning (S&OP), workforce planning, supply chain planning (SCP) and inventory optimization (and possibly more) all in a single solution? While some of the giants in the industry can satisfy all these needs, they tend to do so with discrete applications. Very often those different solutions are the result of acquisition, which means they weren’t developed from a single platform and the integration is far from seamless, if it exists at all. Instead of a single, coordinated plan, you risk having disconnected or even competing plans pulling you in different directions, even though you work with a single vendor.

This is why Anaplan takes a completely different approach. Instead of the traditional point solution approach for each of these planning functions Anaplan offers a single planning platform that is cloud based. The team at Anaplan likes to say, “one platform, unlimited possibilities.” The goal is to connect the organization, end to end.

What’s New in this New Age?

Given the title of our December 2015 report, it is clear the concept of a connected plan is not entirely new at Anaplan. Yet not only has that connectivity evolved, it really is a new age at Anaplan.

New Leadership, New Focus

First of all, Anaplan has a new leader. New president and CEO Frank Calderoni came on board in January of this year. It was a tribute to the rest of the executive leadership that the company hadn’t really missed a beat since former CEO Fred Laluyaux had stepped down in April 2016.

But Mr. Calderoni came with some new ideas. He largely kept the same executive team that worked well without the guidance of a CEO, reflecting his trust in them. He also brought a three-pronged corporate strategy, focusing on:

  1. Customer first: Beyond the cliché, Mr. Calderoni hopes to bring this mantra into the very culture of Anaplan.
  2. More innovation: Expect the investment in improving the technology to grow, but Anaplan will carefully choose where to develop innovation and where to partner. For example, new workflow capabilities will be developed internally because they impact the customer interaction so directly. But Anaplan chose not to re-invent automation of data integration, choosing instead to partner with Informatica. And new visualization capabilities are courtesy of Tableau for advanced analytics.
  3. Focus on community: An engaged and connected community is important to any software company, but more so for Anaplan. It delivers “use cases” or “apps” on top of its planning platform. But as noted in a previous Mint Jutras report,these are not your traditional commercial apps. And Anaplan isn’t the only one creating them. Both partners and customers (i.e. the community) contribute to the growing pool of them.

New Context for “Connected”

Anaplan started out by offering a planning engine built on its patented HyperblockTM technology. This calculation engine supported (and still supports) a level of granular detail that lets you connect all the dots naturally. So back in December 2015, we used the term “connected” in the context of connecting the dots. By changing one (connected) dot, Anaplan automatically propagated that change to any other part of the plan connected to that data. And because visibility and transparency are built in, you can easily adjust the plan as you monitor performance, making it a living plan.

Anaplan is still able to connect all the dots, but today it connects much more.

More Data

First of all it connects to more data. As we noted in previous reports, a planning engine is useless without data and this data might come from any number of sources, including enterprise resource planning (ERP), customer relationship management (CRM), human capital management (HCM), additional financial applications or any other source of structured data. Back in 2015, most of the use cases for Anaplan centered on finance, workforce management and sales, relying primarily on internal data. Supply chain planning had only recently become a focus (late 2014).

In 2016, supply chain planning gained significant momentum for Anaplan. A year ago there were just 10 supply chain apps available. Today there are over 30. Supply chain planning can’t rely exclusively on internal data and communication. It wouldn’t be a supply “chain” if it didn’t involve other enterprises, including suppliers on the back end and customers on the front end. And a supply chain is only as strong as its weakest link, making connections a key criterion for success.

One customer, a manufacturer and distributor of high-end fashion accessories, credits Anaplan’s planning engine for its ability to significantly strengthen its forecast accuracy. Using the tool for demand driven planning has allowed the company to transition from pushing supply (with the hope of it being consumed) to pulling from an accurate forecast of demand. Given the volatility of fashion trends, nowhere in the organization is a living plan more important. And nowhere is it more important to connect directly to external forces driving the seasonality and downright fickleness of the world of high fashion. And nowhere is communication and collaboration beyond internal employees more important.

Prior to doing demand planning with Anaplan, the company had been overly dependent on the information management (IT) project management team to respond to needed changes in planning models. Not only was planning too slow and cumbersome, but the process itself was not flexible, and it took way too long to respond to change. But with Anaplan, the planning team became more self-sufficient and the planning process itself went from being performed monthly to weekly. The company currently plans a week of production and is heading toward daily planning. Given the volatility of high fashion, its products might only stay on the shelf for 3 months. It is critical to connect the plan to sales, social and economic drivers. With Anaplan, the frequency is higher and the data is fresh and planning is connected to reality.

 More Functions, More People, More Connections

While Anaplan’s planning engine is capable of connecting all the dots, oftentimes companies need to work hard to get all the different functions in the organization to play along. Yes, Anaplan is a platform for planning, but typically Anaplan’s customers don’t start out looking for a platform. They start out with one particular group looking to solve a particular problem. In solving that problem they may be collecting data from other parts of the organization and connecting those dots. But there are many more potential problems to solve and more connections to be made.

Anaplan customers tend to start with a single pressing problem, which is solved with a custom-tailored use case. On average, they then go on to solve at least two more, often related problems. Some wind up with 10 or even 30 use cases built on top of the platform. The more use cases, the more connected the enterprise and the more people are pulling together, all working from a cohesive plan.

So what holds customers back from taking full advantage of the platform in order to satisfy all their planning needs? Probably the most common obstacle is the custom nature of the solution. Remember, Anaplan started out as a planning and modeling engine, which makes it flexible and powerful. But if a department within the organization is looking for a quick fix, right out of the box, they might wind up looking elsewhere.

If you have a generic problem and are looking for a rigid, prescribed way of dealing with it, or perhaps you yourself really don’t know how to (theoretically) solve the problem, the solutions that work right out of the box are perhaps your best bet. But if you have a problem that is rather unique to your particular business or that calls for regular changes or course corrections, and you know how you would solve it if you just had the right tools, then a powerful platform that is easily tailored by the business user without a lot of assistance from IT might be the better solution. That’s Anaplan.

Back when Anaplan’s planning platform was first conceived you would have had to start solving the problem from scratch, perhaps with the assistance of a consultant. This is becoming less the case as more and more apps are added to the library of use casesAnaplan App Hub, increasing the likelihood that someone else has solved at least a similar problem previously. But even if they start with a pre-defined app, Anaplan customers will typically custom-tailor it to address their specific needs, either on their own or with the assistance of a growing number of partners.

You might fear that you don’t have the necessary technical skills to custom-tailor the solution. But don’t worry. If you can work a spreadsheet, you have most of the technical skills you need. You might need some assistance from the IT staff to setup the automated data integration from various sources of structured, and perhaps even unstructured data. But since you have freed them up from having to do the heavy lifting normally associated with a custom-tailored solution, they have much more time to work with you on the more strategic stuff.

Over time, most Anaplan customers see a clear path to moving on to solve the next problem and chances are the average number of use cases deployed will steadily rise.

Case in Point

Another Anaplan customer, achieved a 900% return on its investment (ROI) in two years.

A global leader in innovative comfort footwear for men, women and children is a vertically integrated enterprise with five factories around the world. The head of global supply turned to Anaplan to optimize supply planning.

Many of the offered products can be made in any of the factories, although some do some specialized production. Prior to deploying Anaplan, the company had to rely on a planner’s gut feel as to the best source of supply. But there was no financial consideration factored into these decisions even though the trade-offs between cost to make and cost to transport were significant. The head of global supply felt the decisions needed to be more fact based. She needed to be able to easily rebalance allocation. She needed to be able to easily and quickly consider various “what if” scenarios in order to not just make a sourcing decision, but to make the optimal sourcing decision.

It took one year to completely develop a customized use case for optimization. The team tested for six months and then ran in parallel with the old methods in order to prove the cost effectiveness.

They changed some products from being single sourced to dual sourced. They found that while the cost to make certain products in Europe was higher, the offsetting savings were huge. It was also a huge learning experience because some of what they discovered was counter-intuitive. But with the real facts in hand they were able to save about one million euros – a 900% ROI in two years. The long ramp-up was not so much dependent on the skills of the people doing the setup, but rather the nature and complexity of the problem, and the number data sources and volume of data required.

The next step is to move from detailed allocation to more strategic planning, a necessary step to convince the rest of the organization that this disruptive technology is not too good to be true.

Conclusion and Recommendations

In today’s fast-paced world, you need to be working from a well-formulated plan, around which all parts of the enterprise can rally. You also need to marry that plan to performance and make it a living, breathing plan – one that is well grounded in real data and able to respond to the forces of change that impact businesses every day. And the plan needs to bring all the different functions in the organization together. Unfortunately today too many plans are built on solutions that are anything but happily married. Even the different departments live entirely separate lives, either consciously or unconsciously avoiding each other or, even worse, they are in contentious relationships.

When it comes to planning and performance management, Anaplan is not the only kid on the block. But no other company does it quite like this kid. Based on its own in-memory Hyperblock technology, Anaplan delivers a platform that is flexible enough to adapt to your specific needs and solve your specific problems. But it is easy enough for the nontechnical user to work with, especially with a growing number of pre-built use cases.

If your different financial and operational plans are not well coordinated across the enterprise, perhaps it is time to connect them. If your planning and performance management does not enjoy marital bliss, perhaps it is time to connect them. If your current plans are not based on real data, perhaps it is time to connect them. Anaplan’s connected planning is designed for all these connections, but perhaps most importantly, it may just be the path to connect you with reality and guide you into the future.

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Anaplan: A Complete, Connected and Living Plan

A lot of planning can and should happen in any company. It all starts with a business plan, followed by financial planning, budgeting and workforce planning. Then you better have a sales plan, with territories, quotas and incentive compensation, which should tie in with a revenue plan. Of course this leads to demand planning and sales and operations planning. If you want to grow those sales, you better do some marketing and campaign planning. If you sell a consumer product, you might have a trade and promotion plan and you’ll definitely have to plan for inventory. Maybe you need to plan projects. And throughout, you need to watch your cash flow.

But how do you tie all these plans together? How do you stay vigilant, monitor performance and adjust the plan as you move forward? More often than not, you don’t. You rely heavily on spreadsheets and even if you have software tools to help you plan, each department works in its own silo, oftentimes using disparate solutions that essentially ignore each other. This can happen even when you buy these different solutions from a single vendor.

Anaplan has set out to solve this problem by creating an enterprise planning cloud designed to solve any planning challenge across all functions of your enterprise. Unlike most plans, developed at an aggregate summary level, Anaplan’s patented technology supports a level of granular detail that lets you connect all the dots naturally. And because visibility and transparency are built in, you can easily adjust the plan as you monitor performance. Instead of letting your plan lie dormant on the shelf, only to be dusted off periodically (if ever), it becomes a living plan.

The Anaplan Approach

Anaplan takes a platform approach to planning. At the core is its planning engine, built on 64-bit in-memory technology, which facilitates real-time modeling that can handle large volumes of data. As a result, planning can be done using very detailed data that might not be possible without in-memory computing power – think of forecasting for each customer down to the product level, rather than having to make a regional forecast in total or by product category. The planning engine uses Anaplan’s patented HyperblockTM calculation engine. It can perform modeling, including the ability to do simulations prior to making changes. But when changes are made, a full history is maintained.

While this planning engine is extremely powerful, it is useless without data and this data might come from any number of sources, including enterprise resource planning (ERP), customer relationship management (CRM), human capital management (HCM), additional financial applications or any other source of structured data. Therefore data integration is an important piece of the Anaplan Planning Platform. Anaplan has prebuilt many common connectors, but also provides application programming interfaces (APIs) to facilitate building out more custom connectors quite easily.

While the planning engine sits on top of the data, the user interface sits on top of the planning engine. Here is where individual Anaplan customers develop the model map (typically by dragging and dropping elements) and tweak the settings. This is also where the reporting, the analytics and the actual planning gets set up. If you are savvy enough to use Excel, you are savvy enough to set up planning and analysis in Anaplan. In fact the user interface looks and feels a lot like Excel (by design). However, Excel has two dimensions whereas Anaplan let’s you look at your data in any and all of the ways that make sense to your business.

Planning and performance management are business exercises, but all too often it is the Information Technology (IT) department that is required to do the heavy lifting. Plans and actuals often reside in different systems and can only be compared once a data warehouse is built, populated and periodically refreshed. This type of scenario leads to a very common concern among business leaders: over-reliance on IT.

The 2015 Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Study asked leaders to check off all causes for concern over solutions used to actually run their businesses. Forty-one percent (41%) expressed concern over integrity of data, and an equal number (also 41%) were concerned over difficulty in reconciling different sub ledgers and different systems. This situation is only exacerbated during the planning and performance management process. The last thing you need is to make a plan based on faulty assumptions that come from bad data.

Relying too heavily on IT also means waiting for models to be built, and what happens when the model itself needs to change? Are you able to tweak it mid-cycle? Are you able to perform a “what if” analysis?

Over-reliance on IT also means the results aren’t available in real time and are only as good as the last request for analysis.

Not only does Anaplan provide real-time access to the real data (not one or more copies that must be periodically refreshed), but also it removes IT from the middle of the planning process, except of course in IT planning.

Additionally, you have applications built with the platform. Anaplan (and its partners) provide some pre-built apps, but these are all developed with the app designer, so they can easily be modified and managed. Or you can build your own using model templates, pre-built algorithms and business rules.

A Complete And Connected Plan

Planning means very different things to different leaders throughout your organization. If you are in Finance you think of budgeting, cost and profitability analysis and cash flows. But you also forecast revenue. You probably think first of applications for financial planning, budgeting and forecasting.

If you are in manufacturing operations you think of material requirements and manufacturing resource planning (MRP and RRP), long and short term capacity planning (CRP). You worry about the demand plan and how that impacts your supply chain. You try to optimize your inventory. You have a sales and operations plan (S&OP), which by necessity includes a workforce plan. You might try to accomplish all this in your ERP solution, perhaps extended with some specialty applications.

In Sales? You think of account segmentation and scoring, territory coverage and quota assignments, as well as incentive compensation planning. Your primary “go to” application might be sales force automation (SFA) and/or customer relationship management (CRM). But does it really support these planning functions or is all the information sitting in spreadsheets?

Meanwhile your human resources (HR) department is building out a workforce plan. Is that tied in with your sales plan and your manufacturing operations plan? If you start running significantly ahead of your sales plan, how does this potentially impact demand, inventory and other operational costs? What if you are falling short? Does that mean you start to cut jobs? What impact will this have on your ability to respond to a rebound in sales? Are you closing the door to recovery? How does all this impact margins, cash flow, debt, credit?

Anaplan makes these connections based on the different data elements that make up the plan. If inventory (at a warehouse, regional or corporate level) is part of the operational plan and also part of the sales plan, these plans are intrinsically and inherently tied together. Actual sales ties the sales forecast to the revenue plan to accounts receivable to cash flow and profitability goals.

The Right Level of Detail

The key to tying this all together is developing the plan at the right level of detail. If forced to plan at too high a level, you may not be able to connect the dots or even spot problems. You may appear to be right on track, hiding the fact that one region is totally over-performing while others are struggling. Will you have enough people and product in place to service that regional demand or will you be facing chronic shortages in that region while you sit on excess capacity elsewhere? Left unchecked, overall performance could take a nosedive. On the other hand, you may be falling short of your goals because of a serious failure limited to just one area. Over-reacting to an overall shortfall can result in blanket cost cutting measures that could make matters worse.

Anaplan lets you plan and manage performance at the lowest level of granularity required, pinpointing failure or success, and taking appropriate action. Anaplan has already built apps to use as a start (or end) point for functions within finance, sales, marketing, human resources, supply chain and operations. No need to start from scratch. Give yourself a jumpstart in launching what can and should be an iterative process, including the analysis of simulated results.

With the Convenience of the Cloud

And oh, by the way, Anaplan does all this in the cloud. According to Mint Jutras research, few companies today are looking to build out on-premise deployments. When it comes to applications, like ERP, that are used to run the business, companies are almost twice as likely to consider a Software as a Service (SaaS) deployment as a traditional on-premise implementation. We ask the question each year, “If you were to consider a solution today, which deployment options would you consider?” Participants are allowed to check any or all options (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Deployment Options that would be Considered Today

Anaplan fig 1Source: Mint Jutras Enterprise Solution Studies
* Option added in 2015
Note: The time span between the 2011 and 2013 studies was about 18 months as Mint Jutras shifted the timing of the study during the calendar year.

This does not mean SaaS will dominate overnight, simply because there are so many of these solution on premise today, and many are reluctant to simply rip them out and replace them. In fact, with the availability of complementary solutions such as Anaplan, companies have the option of leaving solutions in place while they extend functionality and venture into the cloud.

There are many different reasons for this preference for cloud, not the least of which are cost, ease of upgrade and support of increasingly distributed environments. But perhaps most important to the planning functions, the cloud facilitates collaboration. A plan that is made collaboratively is much more easily accepted and embraced. With fewer constituents fighting the plan and more working together, the higher the likelihood of achieving your goals.

Make it a Living Plan

All too often the planning process is time-consuming and painful. The sooner it’s done, the sooner you can get back to your business. But if that’s the way you feel – and react – you aren’t getting the most value out of the process or the plan. And yet most enterprises today separate the processes of planning and performance management. They quickly lose whatever confidence (if any) they had in that plan.

And then of course, there’s change. Business conditions change. The economy changes. Competition changes. New products and new business models enter the market. On the one hand, you need to keep a snapshot of your original plan (and Anaplan does that). After all, you need to see how close you came to predicting outcomes, in order to continue to get better at it. But continuing to operate against a plan that you know is not achievable is like continuing to behave the same way while expecting different results. That is the very definition of insanity. Or, on a more positive note, continuing to blow out sales quotas with the same inventory plan is a sure way to put the brakes on exceeding quotas.

Anaplan takes a different approach. It fuses the two processes together. You essentially manage performance from the plan. All the reporting and analysis ties back to the plan, which remains front and center of reporting and analysis. You don’t put the plan on the shelf and forget about it until you remember your bonus might be affected or the board of directors starts asking the tough questions. You want to make it a living, breathing plan. That’s the Anaplan approach.

Summary

In today’s fast-paced world, it’s good to have a plan. But it’s not enough just to have a strategic business plan. Finance, Sales, Marketing, HR and Operations can no longer afford to work in their own silos of data, applications and reporting. They all need plans that pull together in order to achieve the overall company goals. The plan needs to be developed collaboratively; it needs to be complete and connected. But in order to take full advantage of opportunity today, it needs to be a living plan. As many of us are closing the year and looking forward to growth in the coming calendar year, now is the perfect time to scrutinize your plan… and perhaps scrutinize the tools used to develop it, manage it … and get ready to exceed your goals for 2016.

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