The Three Dimensions of SAP Business ByDesign Set The Stage for Growth Part 1

Simplicity, Flexibility, Extensibility in the Cloud

In Cloud ERP: The Great Enabler of Growth, Mint Jutras examined how Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solutions delivered as software as a service (SaaS) help companies fuel and simplify growth by addressing people challenges and mitigating risk, while maintaining governance and control. Cloud solutions enable you to fail (or succeed) faster, allowing you to focus on the next and best opportunity for growth. While some of the factors that enable growth are inherent in any SaaS solution, not all cloud ERP solutions are created equal. Targeting mid-size and fast growing companies, SAP claims its SAP Business ByDesign is designed specifically to help these companies grow and maximize profits. In this 3-part series of posts I’ll investigate the merit of those claims.

This is Part 1 of that 3-Part series. If you prefer to skip the suspense you can read the full report now.

SAP Business ByDesign was born in the cloud in 2007, long before “Run Simple” became the mantra of SAP. Yet the initial objective was to simplify, delivering a 100% cloud-based solution for the small to mid-size enterprise (SME), while also fully leveraging SAP’s experience and infrastructure. Instead of reworking an existing product, SAP took a “start over” approach, and over the past seven years has developed and refined a three dimensional design philosophy. Those three dimensions: simplicity, flexibility and extensibility. This philosophy is a perfect prescription for a growing company that needs to get out of the gate fast, but has not yet reached, or perhaps even determined its final destination.

In order to enable growth a solution must be broad (in terms of functionality), flexible and extensible. SAP attacks these requirements with a modern and modular architecture that was born in the cloud. It delivers a next generation user experience that continues to evolve and a business configurator that has become the gold standard within SAP, helping organizations adapt as they grow and change. And finally, it embeds reporting and analytics right in the application itself so that continual oversight and analysis does not become an afterthought.

Architecture

SAP Business ByDesign is modular by design. This should not be confused with simply being comprised of a set of modules. By definition, any ERP solution is an integrated suite of modules. It is how modules are coupled together, or in the case of SAP Business ByDesign, how they are decoupled, that makes a solution flexible or rigid. Most mid-size to large enterprises today no longer grow to be large, monolithic enterprises. They grow modularly, spawning new divisions or subsidiaries to expand to address new products, product lines or territories. But these different business units must interoperate smoothly and seamlessly, making obsolete those legacy ERP solutions that were similarly designed as rigid and monolithic.

One of the guiding principles of the design of SAP Business ByDesign is decoupling. This decoupling is delivered in a variety of ways. Business logic is decoupled from the user interface, allowing for ease of translation and also the reuse of logic and services across any number of different types of interfaces. The same transactions can be triggered whether you are using the product through a browser on a desktop, a mobile application or no user interface at all. Through process automation, sometimes the best user interface is no interface.

In addition, the software modules themselves are essentially decoupled. Instead of hard-coded logic, communication between different modules is message-based. This makes it far easier to add or swap modules and business scenarios as needed or even to consume innovation. With a rigid monolithic solution, the entire enterprise needs to march forward together, oftentimes making some departments wait for much needed enhancements because other parts of the business aren’t ready for change.

While there is a lot of value to be gained from this type of decoupling, there is one area where embedding functionality adds more than it detracts in value. If reporting and analytics are completely separate, they often become an after thought, something the implementation team never quite gets around to delivering. And even if they do, if delivered as an entirely separate function, they are often out of sight and out of mind.

Separating reporting and analytics is often required in order to preserve or improve performance, hence the emergence of solutions for online analytical processing (OLAP) separate from online transaction processing (OLTP). However, from the beginning, SAP Business ByDesign was built using an in-memory database that removes those performance issues and allowed SAP to embed analytical capabilities within the solution. In addition to bringing this analysis front and center, it also provides real time access from a wide variety of data sources, including data from sister companies or headquarters, eliminating delays and speeding decisions. The speed and capacity of in-memory also removes the need to limit the amount or granularity of data needed to help determine where and how to invest next. Instead of using aggregated summary data that might be misleading, SAP Business ByDesign users can dive into a level of detail that would be unmanageable and unimaginable using legacy architectures.

Up Next…

In the next post (Part 2), we’ll take a look at what SAP has done with the user experience and configuration of SAP Business ByDesign.

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